Zimbabwe Leads the Way

Zimbabwe- has a poverty rate at 63%, faces economic crisis and questionable human rights violations. Yet this unsettled country may hold the key to rhino conservation.

This is thanks to the Lowveld Rhino Trust. The LRT is centrally involved in the protection of 90% of the country’s black rhinos in private reserves. With most of Zimbabwe facing the same loss of rhino as other  African countries, LRT is solely responsible for a 10% increase in the black rhino population.

Since 2009, they have worked tenaciously against poaching, attempting to slowly rebuild the rhino population. No easy feat, as they are in the midst of their country’s political and economic  turmoil and unrest.

raoul du toit director of lowveld

Raoul du Toit, director at Lowveld Rhino Trust

So how do they do it?

Like other efforts across the African continent, they relocate rhinos from unsafe areas to  higher protection zones. They fight the same fight, stepping up anti-poaching units, maintaining security and tending to individual rhinos.

Yet the key to their success may lie in their localized efforts. They provide support to the local schools, the amount of their efforts and contribution directly hinging on the rhino growth population. If the rhino populations are thriving, schools receive extra funds from the LRT. If poaching is taking its toll, the funds are removed and applied to extra anti-poaching units.

The idea is to provide incentive to the people to save their rhino, in turn this applies pressure on the poachers from their own communities. As diligent as anti-poaching units are, they cannot be everywhere all the time, so this gives them additional “eyes” and “ears” on the ground.

Win for the rhinos, win for the people.

“We have made many enemies in both the public and private sectors by our efforts to wrestle rhinos away from those who attempt to keep them in ever declining populations, but we have seen annual population growth rates of around 10% as result of our efforts at demographic consolidation in adequately extensive and more secure areas of good habitat, which means that the rhinos can save themselves as the evolutionarily successful species that they are,” says du Toit.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1002-hance-wcn-lrt.html#9T7FtfwUrR3mcZ4v.99
“We try to maintain a situation in which rhinos can save themselves through effective breeding. By concentrating our efforts on the areas that have ecological and economic potential for large, viable rhino populations rather than frantically ‘fire-fighting’ to maintain fragmented populations, we can build and maintain the larger populations to the level that poaching losses (which can never be totally avoided under current funding constraints) are more than compensated for by births,” du Toit says.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1002-hance-wcn-lrt.html#9T7FtfwUrR3mcZ4v.99
the LRT, which is centrally involved in the protection of around 90 percent of the country’s rhinos in private reserves along with conservancy members
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1002-hance-wcn-lrt.html#9T7FtfwUrR3mcZ4v.99
which is centrally involved in the protection of around 90 percent of the country’s rhinos in private reserves along with conservancy members, has proven tenacious and innovative in its battle to safeguard the nation’s rhinos from the poaching epidemic.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1002-hance-wcn-lrt.html#9T7FtfwUrR3mcZ4v.99
which is centrally involved in the protection of around 90 percent of the country’s rhinos in private reserves along with conservancy members, has proven tenacious and innovative in its battle to safeguard the nation’s rhinos from the poaching epidemic.
Read more at http://news.mongabay.com/2013/1002-hance-wcn-lrt.html#9T7FtfwUrR3mcZ4v.99
Categories: Good News, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Post navigation

6 thoughts on “Zimbabwe Leads the Way

  1. Good news is rare, so this is very welcome. Thank you.

  2. Reblogged this on " OUR WORLD".

  3. Pingback: Darkest Before the Dawn | Fight for Rhinos

  4. Pingback: A Teacher’s Take on Ending Poaching | Fight for Rhinos

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: