Good News

Encouraging news for the smallest Rhinos

One of the most unique and endangered rhino species is the Sumatran. These hairy beasts are lesser in size than the rest of the rhinos, and in numbers. With only about 100 known individuals left, they seem to be on the fast track to extinction.

Yet, there is a glimmer of hope.

With such critically low numbers, every birth is a big deal.  When it comes to mothers, the Sumatran Ratu is a star.  Living in the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) in Indonesia she gave birth in 2012, and is now expecting a second baby due in May.

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Ratu’s first calf, Andatu; photo: International Rhino Foundation

This coincides with the recent return of Harapan, formerly from the Cincinnati Zoo, to the wild. In late 2015 he made the epic journey across the globe to the SRS, with the goal of eventually doing his part in perpetuating the species.

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Harapan, happy and healthy in his Indonesian home. Photo: Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary

But perhaps what tops it all is this week’s discovery of 15 previously unknown individual Sumatrans.

In response to this news, the Indonesian government is quickly converting a former gold mine into a sanctuary for them. With hopes to safely transfer them, they will be guarded by a rhino protection unit just like the ones in place at the SRS, which have successfully staved off poaching for more than 7 years.

Rhino Protection Units are comprised of trained 4 man teams. Photo: International Rhino Foundation

 

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APU gets extra help from YOU

THANK YOU!

The “Helping Rangers Protect Rhinos” campaign was a success! We’ve reached our goal for an anti-poaching unit in southern Kruger to attend a human-tracking course.

After experiencing loss of rhino in their area, a ranger had come to us for help to attend crucial training in human tracking. According to him  doing this specified human tracking will enable us to see clearly where and how the poachers came and to follow them if they’re inside the park.

The training will take place in early June with the Colin Patrick Training Company, a highly reputable, experienced training organization.

Here is a peek of Colin’s work with a lucky group of individuals:

We thoroughly appreciate contributions from:
Nick DePilla
Matthew Rossetti
Gaetano Bonaviri
Tony Calvelage
two anonymous donors
Carl Wolter
Edward Zullo
Manuel Pardo
Art by Marion
Anita Wilson
Ted Racheau
Angel Rodriguez
Eileen McCloskey

You have helped make a corner of the world safer for a group of men and countless rhinos and elephants!

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Update on Harapan

Just a few photos of Harapan in his new home at the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia. He’s happy and healthy and seems to have transitioned well!

For more on the epic voyage of the amazing Sumatran who was the last of his kind in the western hemisphere, see New Hope for Sumatrans and  The Journey of Hope.

Harapan Dec 2015

Harapan Dec 2015 2

Harapan Dec 2015 3

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We proudly support the Black Mambas

We have proudly supplied the only all female APU, the South African Black Mambas with financial support for their operation costs for the remainder of 2015.  Thanks to your donations, a total of $2,435 usd has been given toward their day to day expenses; food, uniforms, supplies, etc.

These ladies have made huge strides in their communities, spending 21 days a month patrolling the reserve, teaching locals about wilderness preservation, and keeping an eye out for poaching activities.

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Another day of multiple snare removal in the reserve.

“Each [Mamba] has a story, a dream and a vision for the future, each has a family to support, a community to educate. Funds are scarce, yet they are passionate and determined. For some, they are the only breadwinners, feeding their families on little wages. For others this is a hopeful step towards furthering their careers. For all of them, the love for nature and its conservation runs deep. Their ethos is to protect this heritage of wildlife.” -Julia Gunther, photographer

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Black Mambas at sunset photo: James Suter

 

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Limited Time Rhino Ornaments!

Greater one-horn ornament

 

100% of proceeds from every ornament go toward our rhino conservation projects like Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the Black Mambas APU and our anti-poaching/ranger aid projects.

Can be shipped to the USA, Canada, Australia and the UK.

ONLY $12.50 usd plus shipping

paypal

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Text: Peace, Love & Rhinos

Fight for Rhinos

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Look what you’re protecting!

Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya is the largest black rhino sanctuary in east Africa, and home to the last three Northern White Rhinos in the world. Their efforts in conservation for both species are critical to the future of rhinos.

Thanks to you, Fight for Rhinos has just been able to aid  Ol Pejeta Conservancy’s rhino needs once again.

Your donations  ($3080) have helped the teams ability to monitor and protect the rhinos within the conservancy by providing:

  • Rhino audit (to carry out an independent verification of individual rhinos on OPC) – USD 2000
  • Monitoring equipment – 6 GPS devices @ $ 180ea

Enjoy the following video of one of OPC,s longtime residents; Sudan, the last male Northern White Rhinos on the planet.

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New hope for Sumatrans

In August the Cincinnati Zoo officially announced they would be saying goodbye to Harapan. A bittersweet but important move for the Sumatran rhinos.

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Soon  he will set out on an epic journey to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary (SRS) in Indonesia. This move is in hopes that he will be able to breed and help increase the dwindling numbers in their population. There are only approximately 100 Sumatrans left in the entire world, with only 9 existing in captivity.

The zoo has held the distinction of having the first successful birth in captivity in 112 years. From 2001 to 2012, Emi the Sumatran gave birth to three offspring; Andalas, Suci and Harapan.  In 2007 Andalas was sent to the SRS and successfully bred. Unfortunately Suci has passed away from the same genetic disposition as her mother, Emi.

Now it is Harapan’s turn to join his brother in Indonesia, where he will have 3 potential mates to choose from and hopefully continue his famous mother’s bloodline.

“Ultimately, the responsibility for saving this magnificent species now lies squarely on the shoulders of our Indonesian colleagues. Our hope is that they succeed beyond all of our wildest dreams,” said Dr. Teri Roth, director of the zoo’s Center for Conservation and Research of Endangered Wildlife CREW).

In addition to this urgent move, it was announced on September 22 (World Rhino Day) that there is another Sumatran at the SRS who is pregnant! This baby is the second offspring sired by Andalas.

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Andalas   photo: SRS

“To have a confirmed breeding success at SRS weeks before we send Andalas’ younger sibling, Harapan, to the sanctuary for the same purpose is encouraging and fuels the hope that Harapan will also contribute to the survival of his species, “ stated Roth.

 

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Good News for Greater one-horned rhinos

Much of the focus on rhino conservation and the poaching war centers on Africa. But the issue is just as critical in India, home of the Greater one-horned (also called the Indian) rhino.

Facing the same threats as their African cousins, currently their population hovers around 3,000.

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Mom and baby in Manas. photo: WWF India

Although their future remains in the balance, there is good news. Since 2012 there have been 13 new successful births in Assam. With a gestation period of 26 months, this is exceptional news.

This is a result of  intensive efforts through the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 (IRV 2020) program in which wild rhinos were translocated back into the area. The program’s aim has been to increase the population and range of the greater-one horned rhinos in the area.

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Translocations are complex and these involved the government, local communities and several partners in conservation. photo: International Rhino Foundation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Reading, Writing and Anti-Poaching

According to studies, children’s academic performance in science, math, English and social sciences increase when they have experience with nature and the outdoors—not to mention their sense of ownership and responsibility to their surroundings.(Wildlife Federation)

kenyan school childrenSo it only makes sense to include conservation as part of their education. Afterall, who better to entrust our future generations of rhinos and elephants to than the children?

There are organizations throughout Africa who give the opportunity of conservation education to children. But Kenya has taken it a step further,  getting with the times by introducing anti-poaching and conservation curriculum to secondary schools in the Masai Mara and Serengeti areas.

We decided to introduce lessons on wildlife conservation to these schools to sensitise communities that neighbour the Mara and Serengeti parks on the need to end poaching. The students will visit villages to educate locals on the dangers posed by the menace,”
 said Nick Murero, the Mara-Serengeti Ecosystem Coordinator.

In the areas of Kenya and Tanzania, tourism is a multi-billion dollar business, essential to the livlihood and economies of both countries. It only makes sense to teach the value of wildlife to the children; in theory, it will spread to the local villages, planting the seed of hope for future generations.

             What You Can Do For Your Children

We can all teach our children the importance of protecting our planet. It is our global responsibility.

*Encourage appreciation of nature and wildlife through taking hikes and camping
*Read books to and with your children
*Subscribe to conservation/wildlife magazines and websites
*Teach respect through involvement (i.e recycling, adopting or fostering shelter animals, writing letters to congressmen)

Many conservation/anti-poaching groups offer materials to children to help educate and raise awareness to the plight of our dwindling wildlife.  See the following for resources:

International Anti-poaching Foundation
Save the Rhino
Children for Africa
National Geographic Kids
WWF green books

“WE HAVE NOT INHERITED THE EARTH FROM OUR FATHERS, WE HAVE BORROWED IT FROM OUR CHILDREN”

boy with maalim baby rhino

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Zen for Rhinos

Vietnam is the country responsible for the most demand in rhino horn.

75% of Vietnam is Buddhist.

Recently the International Buddhist Confederation (IBC) announced they would actively promote guidelines and awareness toward the illegal and immoral use of rhino horn.

According to the IBC newsletter, “We should move from Compassion to Action…putting forth the need for a pioneering Buddhist initiative that translates Buddha’s teachings of compassion and wisdom into action for the good of all sentient beings.”

Vietnam’s Buddhist leadership has agreed to launch a comprehensive public outreach campaign against the use of rhino horn on the grounds that it is steeped in violence towards animals, biodiversity and human beings (poachers, rangers, and the victims of illegal trafficking in drugs, arms and people).

It’s consumption therefore is unacceptable for any Buddhist and has to stop.

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Image from Breaking the Brand.

 

 

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