Posts Tagged With: animal abuse

The Tiger Temple: a Disgrace to Buddha

*”Phayru was a very gracious Tiger. He would chuff and lovingly greet most people in spite of his obvious suffering. I watched this tiger try so hard to be exceptionally well behaved for the TSW, and just as I smiled with adoration at his behavior, the remorseless pain of shock and horror gripped my heart again as another violent scene began to play out before my eyes.
Phayru chuffed to the TSW and was doing everything that he was supposed to do when people are near. He showed no sign or display of aggression or negative behavior towards the TSW, just chuffs and obedience. Despite this good behavior, the TSW began yelling and raising his stick, Phayru backed off showing fear and confusion. This visual change of the expression on Phayru’s face was mortifying. The TSW hit Phayru’s genitals hard and yelled at him to move while pointing to a much smaller cell not much bigger then Phayru himself. As Phayru cowered and turned to the small cage I saw his genital and anus area was abnormal and swollen with excretions of blood and pus oozing from everywhere. He was moaning and trying to move quickly to the small cage while the TSW continued to hit him on his genitals. He continued to moan and flinched so much with every hit and was looking up at the TSW with such confusion and with what I can only describe as desperate pleading expression as if to say “Why”?……

The Buddhist religion has long been known for enlightenment and peace. The “live and let live” mentality, never killing or hurting another sentient being, the theme of reincarnation and karma is familiar.  Of course like most religions, there is contradiction.

“Peace comes from within. Do not seek it without.”-buddhism teaching

In Kanchanaburi, Thailand is the Buddhist temple better known as the “Tiger Temple”. Here the monks “bread and butter” comes from there supposedly peaceful relationship with the tigers. For twenty bucks, the  tourists can have their picture children on tigertaken next to a “tame” tiger. For a little extra, you can sit on the tiger’s back for the photo.

Are they “tame”? Of course not. They are chained up, and although not proven, suspicion is they are drugged. They are seemingly very sedate, low energy, and depressed. Even if drugs were not used, their care is questionable.

“Buddhism regards all living creatures as being endowed with the Buddha nature and the potential to become Buddhas. That’s why Buddhism teaches us to refrain from killing and to liberate creatures instead.”~ Venerable Master Hsuan Hua

The Temple claims to be there for the rehabilitation and repopulation of the species. To the temple’s critics, however, that population growth is a problem, chiefly because they say the temple is employing tactics which are illegal. A controversial report released in 2008 by Care for the Wild International (CWI) concluded:

Although the Tiger Temple may have begun as a rescue centre for tigers, it has become a breeding centre to produce and keep tigers solely for the tourists and therefore the Temple’s benefit. Illegal international trafficking helps to maintain the Temples’ captive tiger population. There is no possibility of the Temples’ breeding programme contributing to the conservation of the species in the wild..

The report also writes the tigers are at risk of malnourishment and are routinely handled too roughly by staff. The temple has denied wrongdoing or mistreatment of the animals.

“One is not a great one because one defeats or harms other living beings. One is so called because one refrains from defeating or harming other living beings.”-Buddha

chained tigerIt’s estimated that a century ago there were over 100,000 tigers in the world. Today the population has dwindled to between 3,000 and 3,500 – a decline of over 95 per cent. The Tiger trade is a lucrative business and the Temple is a part of it.

Be aware when you travel. Educate yourself, and if you are visiting an area where animals are present, question how they’re treated. Your tourist dollars could well be the difference between their benefit and detriment.

Read more: http://science.time.com/2010/09/21/too-close-for-comfort-thailands-tiger-temple/#ixzz2PoXnciPb

For more information on Pharyu and the Temple Tigers please see: https://www.facebook.com/BehindtheCloakBuddha

 

 

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Rhino of the Week: Ntombi

Ntombi's wounds.

Ntombi’s wounds.

There are so many amazing stories about our magnificent pachyderms, I thought it’d be fitting to spotlight one each week. Some are miraculous like Thandi, and others heartbreaking, but they all bring a face to their cause.

This week is about Ntombi. Her name means “lady” but perhaps “warrior” would’ve been more fitting. The two month old rhino was with her mother when they were attacked by poachers. The mother was dehorned and killed and Ntombi was slashed 18 times with machetes and axes. It is believed she approached the poachers when they were attacking her mother, perhaps in an effort to defend her.

She is currently living at the Rhino Orphanage (see site I have listed ), and recovering from wounds through her horn and sinus areas. Some of the cuts appear quite deep. As if its not bad enough, the poor girl is also uncomfortable from teething!

Hopefully she will continue to recover.

Ntombi with her caregiver at the Rhino Orphanage.

Ntombi with her caregiver at the Rhino Orphanage.

Categories: Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Extinction is Forever

Gone rhino

     Do you remember the story of the dolphin caught in a net who lost his tail? He was fitted with a prosthetic one.
People banned together to make it happen. They even made a movie about it.

What about Prada the pitbull who faced euthanasia? Her life was saved after an outpouring of public support.
There were multiple petitions. I signed one, actually I probably signed a couple.

It’s uplifting to see people come together, especially to rescue the helpless or injured creatures of the
world. In fact it renews my faith in humanity.

But what about when the survival of an entire species depends on us? What do we do? When does someone come
running to help then? We are witnessing the intentional annihilation of a species. The extinction of the rhino
is 100% preventable. We brought the Bald Eagle back from the brink of extinction. We’ve done this before, we CAN
do it again. The more of us who KNOW, the more of us will CARE. When we care, we can act upon it.

Incase any of you still wonder “Why should I care if an animal in another part of the world goes extinct?”, let me tell you. Firstly the rhino is an “umbrella” species, meaning the survival of their species effects other species, and the ecosystem.   Destroying them will start a domino effect in the environment. Secondly we have a moral responsibility to our planet, as well as to future generations.  WE brought them to the edge of extinction, it is OUR duty to bring them back. And lastly when they’re gone, who’s next?  What other species will we destroy?

If you’re still reading, hopefully you’re caring. So the next question is
What can I do?”

#1 Look for petitions to tell “the powers that be” we will not stand by and let you murder these magnificent creatures. There are tons of petition sites online. You’d be hardpressed to NOT find one. (I would be all to happy to send you some on your email. You only need to ask:)

#2 If you go on safari (or any trips involving animals) share your concern with the travel agency. Be sure not to give tourist dollars to any groups or communities supporting cruelty.

#3 Donate to conservation efforts when you can. I have listed a few of my personal favorites on this site, but there are many others.

#4 Be aware of what you buy. As a consumer you have an immense impact. For example: Nutella is made from palm oil. Demand for palm oil is leading to loss of habitat and destruction to the orangutans.

#5 Probably the easiest thing: spread the word! Rhino horn is NOT medicine, rhinos are endangered and close to extinction.

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thandi’s Story

Thandi found poached.

Thandi found poached.

Thandi recovered.

Thandi recovered.

Amidst the hundreds of rhinos slaughtered in 2012, one rhino beat the odds. Her name is Thandi.

In early March of 2012 three rhinos were found poached in the Kariega Game Reserve. One immediately
died. The remaining two made it through the night. The survivors-Thandi (meaning love) and Themba
(meaning hope) were tended to with intense veterinary care.

Unfortunately after 24 days, Themba died.

Thandi lived. She fought a long, painful battle, but miraculously recovered. She lives without a
horn, without her companions, but she lives with hope. Perhaps the one thing that almost killed her
(having a horn) will now be her salvation.

To follow more about Thandi’s story go to http://www.helpingrhinos.org or http://www.kariega.co/about-us/help-save-our-rhino-project

Categories: Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 12 Comments

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