Posts Tagged With: elephant

World Ranger Day – THANK YOU

world ranger day

The depth of our gratitude is endless, as these people put it all on the line, affording the rest of us more time to rack our brains to come up with a solution. We are indebted to them all for their perseverance and very existence, as without them we would never fully possess our sanity, let alone be able to sleep. To know they are there, on guard, watching, listening; it is a comfort like no other.

Thank you for your hearts, your strength. KNOW we stand beside you during the patrols, in the silence of the night, in the heat of the forest, during times of fear, fatigue, and despair. You are each an inspiration, a hero.

Thank you for everything you do. You are a blessing to the animals. May God keep you safe. -Gerri

Thank you to all the wonderful Rangers that perform such a dedicated job to help save the rhinos from poachers! -Jo Wiest

Thank you rangers! -Lisa Chien Hunkler

The entire Fabrily Team would like to extend our gratitude to the brave Rangers who risk their lives daily to protect our planet’s precious wildlife. Thanks to your efforts rhinos, elephants, lions and many more species are being saved from extinction. Please continue this important work and know that you’ve got our appreciation and support!  ~ Fabrily Team, UK

I visited South Africa in August 2014 and it changed me forever.  I was incredibly moved by the amazing creatures who live in the protected areas.  I became overwhelmed by the amount of nature we have lost on this planet.  And it saddened me greatly.  It still does. I don’t know how to thank you adequately for working to protect what’s left.  I know you put your lives on the line every day to protect animals from harm.  Please know that although I’ve never met you, I think of you all often, and I wish you well. I live in the state of Kentucky, in the USA.  From my small town I’m working to raise money for night vision equipment for rangers.  My group, the Try Anything Rhino Project, has already purchased one piece of equipment that has arrived in South Africa in the last week or two.  I’m now working to raise funds to buy more. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for what you do.  You are all heroes.  I appreciate you more than you’ll ever know!! -Marla Knight-Dutille

 Please give our heartfelt thanks to all he Ranger Heroes out there! Wildlife Guardians, protectors of our precious wildlife, the world is forever in your debt. You truly are Guardian Angels for Wildlife -Thank you so much from Rebecca Bush & Family, UK
rangers 1
Thank you from the depths of my heart. The Indian rhino tattoo on my ankle is a reminder of these magnificent creatures who deserve the right to be free from humans. -Arden Zalman
Where do we begin? Because of YOU these lives carry on… THANK YOU for your dedication!!!! -Carla Viljoen
Thank You Rangers for your dedication and love of Animals. -Norma Crichton
We will never meet or talk, but you are in my mind and heart.  You have my admiration, respect, and gratitude.
I do what I can in the ways that I can, but YOU are the everyday living presence that does the work that will save so much in our world.Thank you, thank you.  I send good thoughts for your safety, health, strength, and peace. Catherine;Santa Rosa, California, USA
A huge thank you for all that you do to protect the vulnerable and magnificent creatures that share this world with us. You are true heroes-Sara Wickenden
Thank you Rangers for your brave efforts to protect wildlife.-Jean du Ross
We need companionate like you to protect these beautiful creatures.  May God Bless and protect you and the animals you care for. Thank you for your dedication and service-Dan Seme
You are the true protectors of our future.you might not know this but your efforts and true love you have for our animals are what keeps the planet alive.thank you from the bottom of my heart.you are true heros -Brendon Hoy
ranger with gorilla
Hello all your wildlife rangers, we want to say a big “THANK YOU” to you all for helping animals! You all are our HEROES!!! –Susanna Sikorski and Jens Strohkirch from Germany

TO ALL OF YOU WHO DO THIS HARD WORK- THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!! I read about as much as I can about your efforts, which are saving so many animals lives—at the same time, you have to deal with criminals who don’t care about anything but greed—so I just say a huge THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS TO HELP KEEP ALLTHE MAGNIFICENT CREATURES ALIVE—I PERSONALLY AM EXTREMELY GRATEFUL FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS—Louise Smith

Rangers, I have the privilege of witnessing daily on WildEarth’s wildsafarilive.com, the love and care guides & rangers have for your wildlife.  I am blessed that I am able to witness ellies, lions, leopards, etc. thanks to the hard work and dedication you all put into your daily lives.  If it wasn’t for you, WE would have nothing to see and admire.  🙂 Keep up  the great work so WE can continue to be in awe.  WE are rooting for you, and praying for your safety and success.  Words cannot express enough, but I can say THANK YOU!Blessings, Vicky Sanders, New Mexico USA

To all the Rangers in the World, You’re true guardians of the Earth and the vital eco-systems we need to desperately protect. I’m heart broken for the tragedy in your work but we must all fight for your triumphs. -Thank you, Paula

KWS rangers line up

 

It is not money, goodwill or millions of people who care so much about wildlife, that actually saves it. That all helps, tremendously; but it is the rangers who actually save our animals. I have never had so much respect for anyone. Thank you! -Jenna Grant

Thank you for all that you do to protect our most precious and endangered wildlife. Thank you for doing your best to keep them safe and sound. You are the extraordinary and elite. I wish you many blessings and thanks. -Love Always, Susan
Thank you so much for all your hard work and dedication to help saving these animals. We all owe you so much.  -Anita
My heart breaks so much each time I read a horrendous poaching story. But it heals each time I hear of the wonderful work you do. Humanity must respect all animals, who give so much to us. Respect their habitat, their spirit and their being. We are all in this together. Thank you a million times over! -Janis Byrne
Thanks for your effort, love and hearts in action towards Rhino protection. Hope for the best outcome in their and your lives in harmony and soon! Love to you all. Many thanks all the way from Argentina. 🙂 -Marita  ❤ 😉
I’d like to thank you for all that you do. You are in my heart, and I am certain in the hearts of every adult and child who has ever reflected on the importance of the preservation of the Earth that we all share and belong to. The feeling of struggle is progressively relieved with every animal that is protected. This helps us all, even economically. We love you! -Santos of California
Zambia female officer
You are protectors of those animals who need you. You are their voice. Without you, they would be gone. I can’t thank you enough for the service you do. Bless you. Please have hope and love in your hearts. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! -Kari Tucker
You’re great at what you’re doing! Keep doing it because we need these animals! They’re important to a lot of people and what you guys are doing is an amazing thing! -Hannah
To my heroes – Thank you for all that you do every day to stop poachers and care for the animals that survive this horrific crime.  What you do for these majestic animals is so amazing.  I can only hope to someday see these animals with my own eyes in their own habitat and it will be because of your efforts.  And if I don’t ever get to see them, knowing that they are still alive because of your efforts is all I really need.  Thank you for saving these beautiful animals. Best-Abbie

Thank you for all you do to protect these beautiful creatures. Full of admiration for your bravery and dedication x Best wishes-Amy G

Beyond thanking you, I am unsure what else to say. You are protecting the inalienable rights, life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, of the wildlife. They lack a voice our society to request the protections which we enjoy and take for granted. Please continue your fine work and let the rest of us know how to better assist you.
Thank you. Sincerely, Ken
ranger with rhino near hand
I want you to know that if I was able I would be there to help. You are an inspiration in this cruel world. What you are doing is truly remarkable and I hope that you continue to save and protect these magnificent creatures. We are losing our beautiful animals on this planet at such a rapid rate it is horrific. Unfortunately mankind carries on. Thank you for all that you do. Keep up the fight. Thank you. –Sandra Mason, Mono, Ontario

On World Ranger Day  my  message of thanks goes to all those men and women who are prepared to lay their lives for the protection of their country’s wildlife heritage. This is often done enduring hardships and difficult conditions , for disproportionately low salaries. Their dedication is often overshadowed by other figures (‘the experts’) who provide technical and scientific knowledge for Nature conservation. Governments , in any country, should make it a priority to provide better conditions for these men and women, the game rangers: not only for the purpose of incentivizing an increasingly important profession, but also to express a nation’s gratitude for their sacrifice. Rangers are aware of the high risks they face , especially where poaching is conducted with extreme determination and violence,  and their choice of enforcing the law makes their work even more commendable. Thank you, for you are today’s heroes for tomorrow’s enjoyment of Nature by our children! –Silvana Olivo, France

Thank you wonderful folks, I appreciate all that you are doing! Bless you, may your lord be with you always! Thank you again! –Carol D

Thank you for your courage and commitment to protect the most endangered animals on the planet. It takes a special kind of person to be a wildlife ranger! –Yasmine Saad

Thank you so much for all that you do to protect our wildlife. Our national and state parks, and the plants and animals within them, are a treasure that you work so hard to preserve and protect—that does not go unnoticed or unappreciated! Your service means the world :)-Sophia D

Thanks so much for all you do to protect our planet! This World Ranger Day, and every day, let us never forget those who have given their lives to protect our wildlife and environment from poachers, polluters, and others intent on causing harm. Your bravery and sacrifices will not be forgotten! –Jeremy Taylor, Ravena, NY USA

So many of you sent support and appreciation for our rangers. We will be sending these messages to our friends at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the Black Mambas APU, Game Reserves United (GRU) & RPU Program in Indonesia.

To further support our efforts with them, please purchase our limited edition summer tee: FIGHT FOR THE RHINOS YOU LOVE tees

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ranger Heroes: Stephen

Thank God for rangers! Poachers and corrupt politicians and Park staff are taking up too much of the headlines. Time to spotlight another one of the “good guys”!

Ranger Stephen

Stephen

Name: Stephen

Age: 26

Location: Segera Ranch in Kenya

What has been your most rewarding OR most difficult moment as a ranger?

Stephen: Being chased by a buffalo!

Where would you like to travel someday?

Stephen: USA, Texas or California

Why the US?

Stephen:  I would like to see it’s development compared to Kenya. I would like also to further my education there. I like the way these people are loyal and patriotic to their country.

What is your favorite meal?

Stephen: meat

What makes you laugh?

Stephen: Friends

What do you wish you had to fight poachers?

Stephen: GPS microchips

What do your family/friends/significant other think of your profession? And do they worry?

Stephen: They love the wild, so they count me as a hero.

 

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Take a Deep Breath…then Fight On

We’ve all seen the photos and articles of the never-ending decimation of wildlife. We all ache with grief, burn with rage and want so badly to help. But what do you do when it all gets to be too much? I asked some of the activists on the frontlines: “What do you do to de-stress/unwind when it all gets to be too much?”

Zen dog

via Reddit

Allison Thomson from OSCAP “When it really gets to be too much I just go and do some housework, gardening, etc., any hard work to take my mind off other things.”

Damien Mander Iapf, International Anti-poaching Foundation “The major stress in my life is the slaughter of animals across the world. Working hard is my way to tackle that stress.”

“Rhino” Ramorulane, ranger at a rhino sanctuary “I just drink lots of water, and  just try to be around people or read books and avoid being alone”

Peter Stewart Rogers DVM at Prolife Veterinary Services in SA “It is very difficult but  I get motivated by the few positive things that happen like a poaching syndicate being busted; orphaned rhino calf being rescued; nursing injured/shot rhino back to health; and taking heart from seeing how much public support there is for this anti poaching war !!!”

zen gorilla

via: Caters

Ofir Drori, founder of  LAGA, Wildlife Law Enforcement “I get my energy from the fight itself. The more I do and the more diverse it is there is always something achieved in the sea of shit for me to get a good nights sleep.  Because there are so many diversified fights at least one thing succeeds per day so it feels like swimming in shit, but succeeding in it. Besides that I have my guitar which is a good therapy for all the violence in my soul.”

Margrit Harris-Executive Director at Nikela-Helping People and Saving Wildlife -“For me I need to get involved with some positive stories. I need to read and watch things that restore my faith in humanity and make me believe again. As for unwinding… I personally take long walks, I sit and watch the birds.” Her advice: When your mind is spinning imagine a huge stop sign appearing right in front of you. Then sing an uplifting tune or transport yourself mentally to a happy place. The mind cannot entertain two things at the same time…..

DSCF2682

via: Tisha Wardlow

Robert Obrein, KWS, Asst Director of Tsavo East and West – “I call my rangers together( those whose area had been infiltrated) and we console each other and talk of what might have happened and our way forward. I always lay blame on me and not the rangers and this has always worked well in cooling their nerves, and God save the next poacher who comes along. I have been in security since 1992 and I have learned to control blood sugars and many more.

 Matt Bracken, ranger at Protrack APU– ” I always find inspiration again when I speak with someone new, and they learn and become involved and actually appreciate spreading the message and slowly but surely turning the tides natures way.”
Paula Kahumbu, KWS, founder of “Hands off our elephants campaign” “I always keep elephants at the top of my mind – whatever I do should add up to saving them, and if I get distracted by feelings, emotions, anger etc, I ground myself again and apologise if I’ve gone wrong, forgive myself for wasting time and energy, then start again…”
 Drew Abrahamson, PA for Dereck and Beverly Joubert , lion activist– ” I tend to listen to a lot of music & also have the pleasure of going to be in the bush fairly regularly…I think that helps too. When things are tough…I kinda keep fighting…& that’s when I fight the hardest…”
A very good piece of advice she was given and passes on: When you lose an animal, a fight, remember-“losses and not defeats”. Those words keep her going every day, especially when the going gets tough.
sleeping rhino

via: mama zen

 For me, my “happy place” is taking a walk outside, somewhere quiet and secluded, where I can be reminded of nature and animals in their own world, without worries of what surrounds them. It touches my soul and strengthens me by reminding me what we’re fighting for.
                                            __________________________
 We’re human. We can’t afford to look away or quit, but sometimes fighting the fight, we need to recharge. So if you need to take a breather-turn off the computer and walk away for a few hours. Find yourself. Remember why you started this in the first place. Take a deep breathe and jump back in.
sleeping lion gif

via: Tay-Roar

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Nepal: What’s Their Secret?

What do conservationists dream of? What would non-profit groups like more than anything? To find a new line of work because poaching is no longer a threat.

Nepal has claimed to have accomplished just that. For 365 days, there has not been one tiger, rhino or elephant killed via poaching. In 2012 only one rhino was lost, and in 2011 there were no animals lost.  It seems almost too good to be true.

The Tiger population has increased over the last four years from 121 to 198; and in a 2011 census rhinos have increased from 425 to 534. 

You can’t argue with the numbers. So what is Nepal doing differently?

Conservation Ethic 

Nepal youth gather to support anti-poaching. (WWF)

Nepal youth gather to support anti-poaching. (WWF)

There has been collaboration on all fronts.

Through community education and incentives, the people have learned to appreciate and value the wildlife. 50 cents per dollar of tourism actually goes straight to the people. This financial benefit makes the rhino, tiger and elephant more valuable ALIVE.

In addition, it gives the people a sense of pride and ownership over their wildlife, which in itself serves as a deterrent to poaching within the community. No man wants to be known as the one who took away money from his village by poaching.

Zero Tolerance

Nepal has put more rangers on the ground. Today, according to BBC, at least a thousand Nepalese soldiers patrol Chitwan from more than 40 posts. But perhaps most importantly the government has empowered those rangers.

Nepalese wildlife rangers track a radio-collared rhino. (Nat Geographic)

Nepalese wildlife rangers track a radio-collared rhino. (Nat Geographic)

According to John Sellar, an organized crime consultant,

“Nepal’s forest law empowers district forest officers and chief wildlife wardens to deal with offenders and impose prison sentences of up to 14 or 15 years.

“Whilst this scenario might seem at odds with other judicial systems,” Sellar says, “probably its greatest advantage is that it means that any poacher who is caught can expect to be dealt with much quicker than in other countries suffering high levels of poaching, where court systems regularly have lengthy backlogs and where, currently, insufficient deterrence is present.”

Strong Leadership and Cooperation

Nepal’s prime minister chairs the national wildlife crime control bureau. The government also has positive partnerships with WWF, National Trust for Nature Conservation, and has been supportive of the Global Tiger Initiative.

Nepal is the poster country for what’s working. Being sandwiched between wildlife trafficking giants China and India, this is no small feat. Surely South Africa and other countries can learn from them.

“We all do better when we work together. Our differences do matter, but our common humanity matters more.” -Bill Clinton

tiger rhino

 

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Hope Floats

Christmas is a time to believe in miracles; a time of hope, faith and love. Please carry that with you as you go forth and spread the word about the war on poaching. Rhinos and elephants are poached at an alarming rate (2 a day for rhinos and 80 a day for elephants), and their future is uncertain. But, they are still here. And while they fight to survive, we must fight for them.

If little Ntombi had the courage to fight the poachers away from her mom, then the determination to fight for survival after those same poachers turned on her with machete attacks, who are we not to keep fighting for her? (Ntombi’s story)

Karen Trendler with Ntombi at the Rhino Orphanage.

Little Kiliguni, the orphan elephant, found dehydrated , wandering alone through the savanna after his mother was poached, tail bitten off, and chunks taken out of his ears from the hyenas who came to feast on his mother’s poached body. He was resilient! Joining the other orphans, forming new familial bonds, and overcoming the odds. Who are we not to take on that spirit and soldier on for others like him? (Kilanguni’s story)

kilanguni ele bottle

Kilanguni being bottle fed at Sheldrick Wildlife Trust.

And the most phenomenal miracle of all: Miss Thandi. Poached, her face hacked open, blood loss, yet still trying to stand, telling us she wasn’t done yet. Treated again and again and again for her wounds, now pregnant! Fighting to survive and to carry on, now gifting the world with another life. How dare anyone give up hope now? If Thandi can carry on, have the will, the strength to persevere, we MUST persevere as well. (Thandi’s story)

thandi nov 2013

Thandi alive and well, 3 months pregnant.

These animals fought for their lives, they are sending us the message they want and need to carry on. We must balance the scales, and help them not just to survive, but to thrive. The dream of seeing a crash of rhino in the wild or a giant heard of elephants marching through the savana-it can come true. It will if we unite and work toward this.

Do not give up.

To donate to Helping Rhinos/Fight for Rhinos, please go to the donations page on the top or click on one of the donations buttons.

Categories: Good News, Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Attention: Writers and Artists

I’ve seen many talented people out there with pieces on rhinos, elephants and making a statement about poaching. I would love to showcase some of your work here on Fight For Rhinos. If you are interested, please submit poetry and drawings, etc to http://www.fightforrhinos@gmail.com

This is an open invitation and there is no deadline. If your work is selected, I will inform you via email.

Keep up the great work people! Rhinos need our attention! Can’t wait to see what you’ve got 😉

happy rhino

 

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Agam, the Sumatran Elephant Orphan

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

At only 3 months of age, Agam was found trapped in a well. Alone, scared, abandoned, he was rescued and placed in the PLG Saree in Indonesia where he is being rehabilitated.

At 10 months old, Agam is still being fed milk supplements around the clock to make up for the nutrients he’s missing from his mother’s milk. In the wild, babies nurse 4-5 years, until the birth of the next calf.

In Aceh, Indonesia, Agam is one of three orphan elephants who have required emergency care in the area. The other two orphans, Raja and Raju, sadly did not survive. Motherless elephants have a high mortality rate. It is a long, uphill battle to successfully raise and rehabilitate them.

These orphans are the outcome of the human-elephant conflict present in Indonesia. In fact in most countries across the Asian elephant’s range, it has replaced poaching as the major human cause of elephant mortality.

Under pressure from higher population densities and lack of fodder, elephant populations are increasingly turning to crop raiding for sustenance. Interestingly, it’s not just the search of food that attracts elephants to villages, but alcohol. When they smell alcohol brewing, they have been known to attack and destroy villages to get to it.

This overlapping of territory, and fragmenting of their usual space and routes, is pushing the Asian Elephant into the brink of extinction. The population is estimated to have dropped 50-75% in the last 60 years.

An iPledge campaign is up and running to enable the purchase of Agam’s life-saving supplements.                        Support Agam here.

Categories: Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

On the menu: Bushmeat

What is the Bushmeat Crisis?

Bushmeat is the term used to describe any wild animal used for food, living in the “bush”. It is most common in reference to the area of Western and Central Africa. This can be apes, lemurs, rhino, elephant, antelope,etc.

endangered lemurs killed for bush in mada

Endangered lemurs in Madagascar killed for bushmeat.

Today bushmeat is important both as a food source and a trade item for poor families in rural and urban areas in Western and Central Africa. It is also often a status symbol for urban elites trying to retain links to the “village”, and often commands a high price in city restaurants.

The commercial bushmeat trade is in direct competition and threatens the livelihoods of rural communities dependent on these resources to meet their basic needs.

“People in the Congo Basin eat as much meat as do Europeans and Americans; approximately 80% of animal protein is derived from wildlife.”

While wildlife has been hunted and used for food since the beginning of time, things have changed considerably. The population density in these areas is greater than the animal population, in addition, factoring in the number of threatened and endangered species, the wildlife can no longer be viewed as a free, sustainable resource.

forestry road

Forestry road through Gabon.

The Logging Industry’s contribution

The growing problem of the bushmeat industry is exacerbated by the construction of new roads to facilitate logging and mining operations, allowing poachers easy access to remote forests. Truck drivers also get involved, as they are routinely bribed into carrying loads of up to 200kg of bushmeat, including gorillas and chimpanzees, out of the forests.

Why not raise cow, chickens and goats?

Domestic “farm” animals are raised in the rural and urban households, but they are viewed as savings and insurance, since inflation is high and access to banks or credit is extremely limited. Even if they wanted to use their animals for a protein source, the area is plagued by tsetse flies which cause the disease, animal trypanosomiasis, making it unfeasible.

Of course hunting in the short-term yields immediate benefits, yet in the long run, this damages their economies in the future.

What does this mean for the environment?

While deforestation is also a  threat to wildlife, over hunting is comparable, if not  worse to the Western and Central African areas. Even in places where there is intact forests, there are no large animals, This is known as Empty Forest Syndrome.

     “Experts estimate that the bushmeat trade could eliminate all viable populations of African apes       within the next five to 15 years.”

Loss of wildlife means a loss of seed dispersing animals that play a key role in determining tree composition and distribution. Over time this will potentially cause irreversible global damage.

Human health jeopardy

gorilla hands

Gorilla hands are considered a delicacy in the Congo.

In addition to environmental and economic consequence, the increased contact between humans and wildlife populations raises the risk of people transmitting animal-derived diseases. Consumption of bushmeat has been linked to zoonoses, including anthrax, ebola, monkeypox, HIV, SARS and foot and mouth disease. Additionally, there is also risk of transmitting human diseases to apes and other species.

Global Concerns

Not just an African issue, thousands of pounds of primate parts, antelope, and other bushmeat are smuggled annually into the United States and Europe. The environmental concerns, the health risks and the responsibility are ours to share. From Lion meat tacos in Florida to  Rat meat in London it’s becoming a black market pandemic.

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America: Land of the Free, Home of the Arrogant

rhino with US flag

Saving the rhino in Africa, from China and Vietnam is a familiar scenario. But another disturbing piece of the equation lies within the US. American hunters have long been drawn to the thrill of “big game”, hunting down rhino, elephant and lion in Africa.

Recently the US Fish and Wildlife Services set a new precedent, giving permission to a hunter to bring back his rhino kill from Africa. This has not been allowed for 30 years. Opening the door to wealthy Americans to slaughter endangered species in the wild for trophies is a dangerous trend to start.

Of course it takes two to tango. Shame on the Namibian government for allowing the hunt, and shame on US Fish and Wildlife for encouraging  the hunter with incentive to keep the trophy.

According to Fish and Wildlife, “The Service cannot and will not allow the importation of sport-hunted trophies of species protected under the Endangered Species Act unless a comprehensive review determines that those trophies are taken as part of a well-managed conservation program that enhances the long-term survival of the species.”

What is well-managed? It seems if any of us had well-managed a species, they wouldn’t be endangered. And what  is the point of cartoon trophy huntrecognizing and labeling a species as threatened, vulnerable or endangered if we’re going to allow them to be hunted down? Is it because if they seem more rare, the price tag on their heads rises, and in the end both governments make more money?

Pro-hunting groups will have you believe by paying to hunt a species, the funds go toward saving them, therefore making conservation sense. However, in this particular case Namibia made $175,000 for their “conservation fund” which in reality is a general fund used for multiple purposes, including rural development; hardly a benefit to the rhino.

However to satiate American hunters’ needs to “bag the big one”, they can also kill endangered species closer to home.  In Texas alone, there are 500 ranches that in recent years have switched from raising cattle to the multi-million dollar industry of “exotic hunting”. There are species here thriving in Texas, that are almost extinct in Africa (i.e three species of endangered antelope and Grevy’s Zebra). Yet they survive only to be killed.

Not only is it illogical and seemingly unethical to breed endangered species simply to exterminate them, but the other part of the issue is the method of the hunt. Many of these hunts are canned hunts, which some within the hunting community even see as unethical.  (See previous post: Shooting Fish in a Barrel)

Endangered animals need protection. Not just from the country they’re in, not in a ‘save by killing’ method, there are no exceptions. They need to be encouraged to breed, given space to do it in, and given the every chance to survive.

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Prince William: Poaching Gets Attention from the Royals

Prince William has been throwing his royal weight behind endangered species. He’s pleading with the public to put an end to illegal trade. He has warned that his generation will be the first to regard elephants, rhinos and tigers as “historical creatures in the same category as the dodo”.

Taking part in The End WIldlife Crime Conference, which consisted of conservationists and politicians, he emphasized to the group the seriousness of international illegal trade. They discussed ways to tackle smuggling, and worked to generate ideas to be discussed at a future meeting this autumn.  The autumn meeting will be attended by heads of state from across the world.

Grant Miller, of the UK Border Force, said that in the past year more than 675 items had been seized, including a Rolls Royce with alligator skin upholstery, 1.6 tonnes of tortoise jelly, books bound in elephant hide, phials of bear bile used in traditional medicines, a bottle of whiskey containing a whole snake and numerous rhino horns concealed in china dolls  and a live Geoffroy’s Cat.

Prince WIlliam is the royal patron of the wildlife charity, The Tusk Trust. He , just as his father, seems invested in the future of the world’s wildlife. Will his influence be able to help save the rhinos, tigers and elephants to share with his son?

prince william with rhino

Prince William feeds a five-year-old black rhino called Zawadi during a visit to Port Lympne Wild Animal Park in Kentearlier He has called people involved in the illegal trade of rhino horn ‘extremely ignorant, selfish and utterly wrong.

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

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