Posts Tagged With: global

Why March for Elephants and Rhinos?

This weekend marks the second annual Global March for Elephants and Rhinos. In cities across the world, people will be gathering, uniting to raise their voices against the poaching and destruction of two of our most iconic species.

But what’s the point?

In key consumer cities and areas of transit of ivory and horn, there will be MOUs (Memorandum of Understanding) obtained and delivered to the embassies; like  South Africa, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Kenya, Vietnam, and China.

In other cities like San Francisco and New York, groups are writing petitions to be delivered to local and state agencies on the on same day.

And at the very least, creating education and awareness for local communities and schools is vital to the future of not only these two species, but our wildlife in general.

FFR rhino ele

In a nutshell the Global March seeks to:

  • ask for political will and leadership to end wildlife trade
  • have governments adopt stronger legislation for wildlife traffickers
  • ask governments to put a complete ban on trade of wildlife parts
  • shut down all ivory and horn industries

Whether in person or behind your computer, you can a part of the change. Please see the Global March page for a city near you.

global march logo

 

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Another Terrorist Attack funded by poaching

Violence begets violence.

FACT: Elephants are poached by terrorist groups in order to obtain ivory to fund their terrorist operations.

A swarm of gunmen stormed a Kenya university before dawn Thursday, opening fire and taking hostages.

At least 70 people were killed at Garissa University College, the Kenyan Interior Ministry said.More than 500 students remain unaccounted for at the campus that had about 815 students, according to the Kenya National Disaster Operation Center.

The Somalia-based Al-Shabaab militant group claimed responsibility for the assault.

Kenyan defence force

The Kenyan Defence Force outside the university in Kenya. (the NewDaily)

 This is NOT a rare happening. The kidnapping of Nigerian girls , the Westgate Mall attack in Kenya …these attacks are funded by elephant poaching. Boko Haram, Al-Shabaab, Al-Qaeda…they make up to 40% of their organizational funding for weapons, training, and basic supplies; through ivory.

The demand for ivory and horn stems from the Asian market; using both ivory and horn for medicinal purposes, in carvings, artwork, jewelry, and as a status symbol. The devastating effect on both elephant and rhino populations is making the product more difficult to come by. High demand, low supply equal ludicrously high product value. And THIS is the attraction for the terrorist groups.

Paying poachers less than $100 usd to do the dirty work, they gain approximately $2000/kilo in the sale of the ivory. Rhino horn is also a valued commodity for the terrorists, at a whopping $65000/kilo on the black market. An easy cash flow with little risk.

Shouldn’t the buyers of ivory and horn be held responsible for the deaths of innocent victims? At the very least they are accessories to the crime.

 It’s time to stop looking at poaching as simply an “animal rights” issue or an “African problem”. With terrorist attacks plaguing the US, Europe and African countries alike, this is a global concern demanding immediate action from every country. It’s time to get serious.

terrorism

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Will Celebs Make a Difference for Rhinos and Elephants?

With the virtual genocide of elephants and rhinos, more celebrities are speaking out. Will their clout help turn the tides? As we approach the international march for global awareness (Oct 4), we take a moment to thank all the celebs who are speaking out!

Kristin Davis

Kristin Davis

 

 

 

 

 

Kristin puts her acting on the back burner to save elephants.

 

Richard Branson

Richard Branson

 

 

 

 

 

Richard’s message on saving the rhino

 

Paul Mccartney

Paul McCartney

 

 

 

 

 

Paul’s guitar is auctioned off to save elephants

 

Olivia Munn

Olivia Munn

 

 

 

 

 

Olivia urges the boycott of circuses to stop elephant abuse

 

Get Out Alive - Season 1

Bear Grylls

 

 

 

 

 

Bear is an advocate for Helping Rhinos/Fight for Rhinos

 

Jacki Chan

Jacki Chan

 

 

 

 

 

Jackie’s PSA on saving rhinos

 

Ian Somerhalder

Ian Somerhalder

 

 

 

Ian’s foundation helps all wildlife, including rhinos and elephants.

 

Christie Brinkley

Christie Brinkley

 

 

 

 

Christie creates awareness by speaking out against rhino and elephant poaching.

 

 

Prince William

Prince William

 

 

 

 

 

Will advocates for rhinos.

 

Chelsea Clinton

Chelsea Clinton

 

 

 

 

 

Chelsea is working to save the elephants

 

Yao Ming

Yao Ming

 

 

 

 

 

Yao is a spokesman in China for saving the rhino and elephants

 

David Beckham

David Beckham

 

 

 

 

 

David teamed up with Yao Ming and Prince William in a PSA to save rhino and elephants.

 

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep

 

 

 

 

 

Meryl helped urge New Jersey to pass the ban on ivory

 

Ricky Gervais

Ricky Gervais

 

 

 

 

 

Ricky is a supporter of the Global March for Elephants and Rhinos

 

celeb 3 Leonardo DiCaprio

Leonardo DiCaprio

 

 

 

 

 

Leo is a busy man, speaking up for rhinos, elephants, climate change AND making 2 movies about poaching.

 

Celeb 5 Billy Joel

Billy Joel

 

 

 

 

 

Billy supports the NY ivory ban.

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Poaching: Its Killing More Than “Just Animals”

A reason to be concerned about the poaching crisis in Africa, besides the danger of extinction to elephants and rhinos, is the effect on people. At $19 billion per year, the illegal wildlife trade is a lucrative international crime.

EarthThe wildlife trade includes not only the slaughter of the elephant and rhino for their ivory and horns, but the slaughter of great apes and tigers for meat and pelts, as well as the smuggling of exotic birds and other animals for pet sales.

tusksPeople worldwide have turned to poaching as the desired moneymaker over other options, because the payoff is tremendous and the penalty is minimal; a criminal’s dream.  Rhino horns are worth more than cocaine or gold. Whereas the penalty is generally a fine and little or no jail time. Arrests often don’t even lead to convictions.

It is most often the average citizen poaching to support his family (not the organized higher-ups/kingpins) who gets caught.

Although poaching, which is part of the illegal wildlife trade, is ranked fifth in the world, it is used as a means to fund other criminal agendas, such as the top three (see above graphic).

Rebel and militia groups, criminal syndicates, and even terrorist organizations are using the lucrative black market  to finance their operations,

One example is The Lord’s Resistance Army, which has kidnapped hundreds of boys and girls across central Africa to be fighters and sex slaves, are participating in this illegal trade. Another is thought to be Janjaweed militia from Sudan, who allegedly killed 86 elephants (including pregnant females) in one week.

At one of the highest levels of the rhino horn trade chain, are the leaders of Asian run syndicates that monopolize the flow hornsof horn from South Africa to Asian markets. These individuals are the “kingpins” of the trade, often using different people to front as bogus hunters in rhino trophy hunts.

For a clearer picture of the process and the far-reaching implications of poaching and illegal wildlife trade, see the following IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) graphic:

IFAW: The Implications of the Illegal Wildlife Trade

In addition to funding the sex trade, drug cartels and terrorist groups,  poaching activity puts wildlife officials and their families in mortal danger as well. There have been at least 1,000 park rangers killed in 35 different countries over the last decade alone.

Every 15 minutes an elephant is killed.

Each day, 2-3 rhino are slaughtered.

At least 1 tiger a day is butchered.

Of course there’s no way to tell how many people die as a result from the poaching and trade, directly or indirectly through funding of the other lucrative crime it supports.

With far-reaching consequences to human and animal life, as well as the environment, we as individuals need to demand our governments bring an end to the organizations behind this tragedy. Once our animals go extinct, it won’t be long until it is our turn.

ele and rhino friends“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”
Chief Seattle

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The Elephant in Times Square

EVERY DAY…

*There are 100 elephants killed  for their meat and ivory.

* 2 rhino are killed for their horn (a lesser amount due to the lesser population). A rate that has increased an unimaginable 3,336% in 4 years!

Poaching is killing not just our animals, but our economies and through vast criminal networking-our people. Poaching is not just the deed taken on by the poor man, but terrorist groups, using the funds of the ivory and horn for their darker cause, making the illegal wildlife trade the fourth most lucrative global criminal activity.

This is a global issue needing IMMEDIATE attention from our people, and immediate action from our governments.

Therefore one of the biggest global issues of our time, concerning the biggest land mammal should have the biggest platform…Times Square in New York.

The advocacy group March for Elephants  envisioned a billboard in Times Square to bring an urgent call of action to the poaching crisis. The enormous digital billboard will be launched on Sept 29th and will run for a month at a frequency of once every 2 minutes, 24 hours a day. (Using imagery and art, it will feature the tragedy of extinction caused by greed and question if trinkets are worth the price.)

There is a campaign to raise $25,000 to fund this endeavor. Elephants NEED this exposure. Many people are not even aware they are in danger. If we can’t stop this, they will be gone in just 10 years.

Please go to THE ELEPHANT IN TIMES SQUARE to make a donation.

Watch here on Youtube: The Elephant in Times Square

elephant in times square

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

On the menu: Bushmeat

What is the Bushmeat Crisis?

Bushmeat is the term used to describe any wild animal used for food, living in the “bush”. It is most common in reference to the area of Western and Central Africa. This can be apes, lemurs, rhino, elephant, antelope,etc.

endangered lemurs killed for bush in mada

Endangered lemurs in Madagascar killed for bushmeat.

Today bushmeat is important both as a food source and a trade item for poor families in rural and urban areas in Western and Central Africa. It is also often a status symbol for urban elites trying to retain links to the “village”, and often commands a high price in city restaurants.

The commercial bushmeat trade is in direct competition and threatens the livelihoods of rural communities dependent on these resources to meet their basic needs.

“People in the Congo Basin eat as much meat as do Europeans and Americans; approximately 80% of animal protein is derived from wildlife.”

While wildlife has been hunted and used for food since the beginning of time, things have changed considerably. The population density in these areas is greater than the animal population, in addition, factoring in the number of threatened and endangered species, the wildlife can no longer be viewed as a free, sustainable resource.

forestry road

Forestry road through Gabon.

The Logging Industry’s contribution

The growing problem of the bushmeat industry is exacerbated by the construction of new roads to facilitate logging and mining operations, allowing poachers easy access to remote forests. Truck drivers also get involved, as they are routinely bribed into carrying loads of up to 200kg of bushmeat, including gorillas and chimpanzees, out of the forests.

Why not raise cow, chickens and goats?

Domestic “farm” animals are raised in the rural and urban households, but they are viewed as savings and insurance, since inflation is high and access to banks or credit is extremely limited. Even if they wanted to use their animals for a protein source, the area is plagued by tsetse flies which cause the disease, animal trypanosomiasis, making it unfeasible.

Of course hunting in the short-term yields immediate benefits, yet in the long run, this damages their economies in the future.

What does this mean for the environment?

While deforestation is also a  threat to wildlife, over hunting is comparable, if not  worse to the Western and Central African areas. Even in places where there is intact forests, there are no large animals, This is known as Empty Forest Syndrome.

     “Experts estimate that the bushmeat trade could eliminate all viable populations of African apes       within the next five to 15 years.”

Loss of wildlife means a loss of seed dispersing animals that play a key role in determining tree composition and distribution. Over time this will potentially cause irreversible global damage.

Human health jeopardy

gorilla hands

Gorilla hands are considered a delicacy in the Congo.

In addition to environmental and economic consequence, the increased contact between humans and wildlife populations raises the risk of people transmitting animal-derived diseases. Consumption of bushmeat has been linked to zoonoses, including anthrax, ebola, monkeypox, HIV, SARS and foot and mouth disease. Additionally, there is also risk of transmitting human diseases to apes and other species.

Global Concerns

Not just an African issue, thousands of pounds of primate parts, antelope, and other bushmeat are smuggled annually into the United States and Europe. The environmental concerns, the health risks and the responsibility are ours to share. From Lion meat tacos in Florida to  Rat meat in London it’s becoming a black market pandemic.

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URGENT-Please Vote to Save the Rhino and Elephant


https://globalimpactchallenge.withgoogle.com/#/zsl

Urgent- please take just a moment and watch this video clip of the new advancement to battle the war on poaching! This campaign needs every vote! With just a click we can make a difference and be part of the solution!

rhino mom n babe

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