Posts Tagged With: international

Understanding the “Appendix” for Rhinos

Getting serious about preserving rhinos entails international cooperation. The first step is to set a definitive standard which all countries can and will be responsible for.

rhino charge white

The way to do this is through CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora). CITES is an international agreement between participating countries that sets the standard to regulate wildlife imports and exports among them.

The group meets once every 3 years in different countries to discuss varying proposals. This year, in September they will meet in South Africa.

Depending on their level of vulnerability, species are listed in three categories called Appendices.  Appendix I is the most vulnerable (threatened with extinction) and Appendix III is the least vulnerable.

Black rhinos are listed under Appendix I, but white rhinos are listed under Appendix II (for the exclusive purpose of allowing international trade in live animals to appropriate and acceptable destinations and hunting trophies).

only one predator United for wildlife

graphic: United for Wildlife

Conservationists are advocating for CITES to upgrade ALL rhinos to Appendix I.

What this will accomplish is to make it illegal to transport rhinos out of the country; ending the trade debate, as well as the majority of trophy hunting of rhinos.

As the rate of poaching continues unabated, it only seems logical to offer them the utmost protection on an international level. Please read and sign the following petition to ask the head of CITES to make this a priority.

this is our fight

 

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Introducing Rhino Alliance

Fight for Rhinos is dedicated to saving the world’s rhino, but we can’t do it alone. To maximize our impact on ensuring a future for rhinos, we have teamed up with other non-profit organizations across the globe to form Rhino Alliance.

RA 1

 

RA 2

These independent rhino conservation NGO’s across the world will share resources, best practices and most importantly work together where possible.

Time is of the essence and every action taken is vital. By joining forces we can increase the effectiveness of combined efforts of education, anti-poaching strategies and initiatives.

Our goals and campaigns at Fight for Rhinos remain intact. But with support and cohesion across the globe, we hope to enhance our impact.  Stay tuned for our upcoming projects…it’s going to be an exciting year! We hope to change the world (for rhinos at least)!

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Poaching: Its Killing More Than “Just Animals”

A reason to be concerned about the poaching crisis in Africa, besides the danger of extinction to elephants and rhinos, is the effect on people. At $19 billion per year, the illegal wildlife trade is a lucrative international crime.

EarthThe wildlife trade includes not only the slaughter of the elephant and rhino for their ivory and horns, but the slaughter of great apes and tigers for meat and pelts, as well as the smuggling of exotic birds and other animals for pet sales.

tusksPeople worldwide have turned to poaching as the desired moneymaker over other options, because the payoff is tremendous and the penalty is minimal; a criminal’s dream.  Rhino horns are worth more than cocaine or gold. Whereas the penalty is generally a fine and little or no jail time. Arrests often don’t even lead to convictions.

It is most often the average citizen poaching to support his family (not the organized higher-ups/kingpins) who gets caught.

Although poaching, which is part of the illegal wildlife trade, is ranked fifth in the world, it is used as a means to fund other criminal agendas, such as the top three (see above graphic).

Rebel and militia groups, criminal syndicates, and even terrorist organizations are using the lucrative black market  to finance their operations,

One example is The Lord’s Resistance Army, which has kidnapped hundreds of boys and girls across central Africa to be fighters and sex slaves, are participating in this illegal trade. Another is thought to be Janjaweed militia from Sudan, who allegedly killed 86 elephants (including pregnant females) in one week.

At one of the highest levels of the rhino horn trade chain, are the leaders of Asian run syndicates that monopolize the flow hornsof horn from South Africa to Asian markets. These individuals are the “kingpins” of the trade, often using different people to front as bogus hunters in rhino trophy hunts.

For a clearer picture of the process and the far-reaching implications of poaching and illegal wildlife trade, see the following IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare) graphic:

IFAW: The Implications of the Illegal Wildlife Trade

In addition to funding the sex trade, drug cartels and terrorist groups,  poaching activity puts wildlife officials and their families in mortal danger as well. There have been at least 1,000 park rangers killed in 35 different countries over the last decade alone.

Every 15 minutes an elephant is killed.

Each day, 2-3 rhino are slaughtered.

At least 1 tiger a day is butchered.

Of course there’s no way to tell how many people die as a result from the poaching and trade, directly or indirectly through funding of the other lucrative crime it supports.

With far-reaching consequences to human and animal life, as well as the environment, we as individuals need to demand our governments bring an end to the organizations behind this tragedy. Once our animals go extinct, it won’t be long until it is our turn.

ele and rhino friends“Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it. Whatever we do to the web, we do to ourselves. All things are bound together. All things connect.”
Chief Seattle

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 13 Comments

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