Posts Tagged With: nature

Secrets of the Black Rhino

Watch this short Discovery clip of black rhinos at night. It’s amazing the things nature has to teach us, and all we still don’t know about our ancient pachyderms.

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Clash of the Titans


Check out these amazing photos of a black rhino brawl. A younger male confronted the older bull. Both endured battle wounds, but walked away in one piece, with the youngster eventually submitting to the more seasoned veteran.

Photos: Richard de Lange/Africa Geographic

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Small birds with their Big friends

Some lovely photos from our friend Jo:

 

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A tragedy larger than Harambe

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Harambe, Cincinnati Zoo

A silverback gorilla, a toddler, and a decision to be made. The untimely demise of Harambe is stirring debate across the country.

Forced to act quickly, the zoo’s response team was in an unenviable position. Animal behavior is unpredictable, they’re wild. But so are people.

In 1996 at the Brookfield Zoo a toddler fell into the gorilla exhibit, in 1999 a man was found dead with a killer whale at Sea World, in 2009 a woman jumped into the polar bear enclosure at the Berlin Zoo, in 2012 a toddler fell into an African Wild Dog enclosure; the list goes on.

It makes you wonder, should enclosures be made to keep animals in? Or to keep people out?

Since 1990, animals died during escapes or attacks 42 times in U.S. zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, 15 zoo incidents resulted in the loss of human life, and 110 resulted in injury according to Born Free, USA.

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Gugu the Panda @Beijing Zoo

People entering enclosures range from “accidental” like the toddler in the Brookfield Zoo and the current case with Harambe, to suicidal, and downright deranged. The Beijing Zoo has had multiple occasions of people entering  Gugu the Panda’s exhibit to “hug” him. He’s bitten them every time, but it hasn’t seemed to stop the incidents.

So what is the point in zoos? Do they contribute to conservation? Spark appreciation? Or are they outdated and unnecessary?

When bringing my son to the zoo, we would meander from one exhibit to another, observing the animals; discussing each one, explaining their habits, their likes and quirks. We bonded over our love for animals. He learned appreciation, respect, and the connections all of us as living beings have in the world.

In the age of cell phones, selfies, and convenience, are zoos an insignificant place where the awe and wonder of animals are taken for granted? Is conservation just a trend on twitter? What is more endangered, the animals or our empathy and connection with our world?

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The oldest zoo in America is the Philadelphia zoo, opened in 1874. The first animal was a raven.

 

 

 

 

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Save our moms

 

A mother’s love knows no bounds,
it matters not the species.

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Rhino babies stay with mom for 2-3 years. They rely on her for sustenance, guidance and protection. Help us keep moms safe from poachers! Please support our conservation projects and DONATE.

 

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Baby rhino gives Sudan new lease on life

The baby southern white rhino was abandoned by mom and found by the Ol Pejeta team when he was only 2 weeks old. Very sick and barely alive, he has made an amazing recovery with the help of caretakers.

Named Ringo, after rhino advocate Ringo Starr, he has been introduced to Sudan, the last male northern white rhino on the planet. The two make quite the pair. Click below to watch more:

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 Photo By: Camilla Le May Photography

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Unusual Rhino Encounter in Kenya

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya: Guests were in for a rare treat on safari. They happened upon this group of rhinos. The unusual part? It was a black rhino mom and calf meeting up peacefully with a white rhino mom and calf.

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THIS is extinction

To truly grasp the enormity of extinction, you must hear the last song of the Kauai O’o bird..

Imagine being the last…

 

 

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Respect the Rhino

Rhino attacks on humans are extremely rare. By nature they are mainly solitary animals and will only charge if feeling threatened, something more common in the case of a mother protecting her calf.

Animals rarely, if ever attack without warning. The key is to be aware of the signs they exhibit. In the case of rhinos, they will show their irritation with curled tails, snorts, or stomping/digging at the ground.

When they get irritated enough, the first charge is often a “mock” charge, stopping short of a full on attack.

We were once charged by a male rhino who was following a female and calf, in hopes of breeding. The warning given to us was a quick snort and prolonged stare in our direction. He charged at the vehicle but stopped short of any real damage.

Needless to say, we apologized and left very quickly.

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The male in the front was hoping for further “romantic” pursuit with the female in the back. Unfortunately we were intruding. This was the last shot before he lifted his head and let his displeasure be known. photo: Fight for Rhinos

In the case of the rhino, and more commonly heard of elephant “attacks”, it is almost always the fault of humans getting too close and not respecting the signs of the animals.

Following nature’s rules is a matter of common sense.
1. Never get too close, maintain a respectful distance; especially in the case of a moving animal. If he is coming in your direction, don’t block the way.
2. Be quiet. The beauty of being in close proximity is in being a part of the environment. Do not make loud sounds or unnecessary noise.
3. Pay attention to an animal’s body language. Gauge the situation, if an animal is in musth or has a little one close by, back off.

Remember this is THEIR home. You are the guest.

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In a more comical “attack”, this baby elephant flared his ears, shook his head and mock charged us, while his family continued to browse around him. photo: Fight for Rhinos

 

 

 

 

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The Amazing Lammie

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Lammie resting in the shade. photo: Fight for Rhinos

There are no limits to the variety of residents taken in at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre. With a specialty in cheetahs, they also house a feisty zebra, retired circus lions and poaching survivors Dingle Dell and Lion’s Den.

But in 2014 a special little rhino was brought to the centre; Gertje, or little G, as he affectionately became known. The orphaned little rhino was traumatized after witnessing his mother brutally poached. Even with the diligent compassion and nurture from his human caregivers, he needed something more.

At 3 weeks of age, Lammie was brought to the Centre and introduced to Gertje. The unlikely duo quickly formed a bond, following each other by day, sleeping together in the evenings.

Not long after, Matimba, another orphaned rhino was rescued and introduced to the duo. Once again, without hesitation, Lammie welcomed the new orphan, the odd little family grew to three.

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Feeding time means three heads often vying for the same bowl. Lammie seems to have no concept that she is somehow the smallest of the three. Photo: Fight for Rhinos

This last year has seen the family grow again, with the addition of orphan rhinos Stompie and Balu. And with the photos of the quartet, as always she is a familiar face never far off.

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Gertje, Matimba, Stompie, Balu and Lammie. Photo: HESC

She is not partial to rhinos, as she recently showed with her mothering skills of Amanzi, the baby elephant.

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Click photo for video. Lammie and Amanzi via Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre

 

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Lammie photo: Fight for Rhinos

The now 2 year old lamb has been an integral part to so many lives; part watchdog, part companion, part mother-she is a special girl; playing a larger role in the rehabilitation of her endangered companions.

Although she seems to have no idea. She is simply content with her share of the love, always there to “help” clear the food bowls and receive her pat on the head.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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