Posts Tagged With: ranger

If Sudan could speak..

Sudan is THE LAST male northern white rhino on our planet. One of his caregivers at Ol Pejeta Conservancy has some wise words from the majestic, soon to be extinct rhino in his care:

Sudan you are ok and healthy,though you spend many days alone,I wish you can tell the story more than i do; tell them how life was in southern Sudan, before that finger pulled the trigger and saw your brothers, sisters and cousins brought down,helplessly bleeding with their God given horns hacked..

..before humans reproduced and took the land meant for you and your colleagues,tell them what it feels to be last of your kind in the whole world! And tell them that you are the way you are because of them.

Right, let me help you, and I will be straight:  their lust for sex , I mean to satisfy their craving for it, have used your horn as an aphrodisiac, as well as to prove their social status and make them beautiful; yes, their immature beliefs in the medicinal value of your horns.

Tell them that the most stupid man is the one who lives, eats sumptuous food, wears well at the expense of your life, yes….And the most ugliest woman and lady is one who catwalks with ornaments made of rhino horns at the expense of your own natural beauty. Its shame: from the greed of power to the greed of social status quo and boost of immorality.

You are you, just you alone in the world! The truth is that you deserve equal rights with all human beings. Anyway I will stop but I will remind the human race that there is no grief in life as great as denying the truth until it is too late.

The big question is where are you within the circle of conservation my friends- food for thought.🤔

Sudan, photo: James Mwenda

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Update on Chloe

Thank you to everyone who’s donated or purchased a tee. So far we have raised $270 toward Chloe’s anti-poaching class!

She has started her training, but still needs $852 to cover the total ($1152.00) Here’s a glimpse of her hard work-this is Chloe identifying rhino horn:

Please consider donating through our Paypal link.

 

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Rangers can’t do it alone-they need your help!

“Truly speaking, I didn’t believe it until the third day after. I asked myself why did this happen in OUR section? I didn’t know what to do, but deep down in my heart I was hurting seeing that rhinos lying helpless, (killed) for its horn.

One thing that kept coming in my mind was How did these people manage to get to this place without  anyone seeing them?   Many questions kept coming but with no answers.  As for my heart it was painful, as it is now answering these questions. I’m hurt; and your must remember if a rhino is poached under your supervision there’s a lot of suspense; and as a young field ranger like me, it can make or break your career.

All you have to do is to be mentally fit and tells yourself that tomorrow I’ll do better to save this species.”

ranger near poaching

Ranger at site of a rhino poaching incident in Kruger 01/15. Kate Brooks / Redux Pictures for Al Jazeera America

This ranger, as with many on the battlefields of the poaching war in Africa, is frustrated, and in need of help; help to fight against the scourge of poaching that threatens not only an entire species, but his career and family.

Rangers are trained in areas of wildlife; tracking animals, wildlife identification, patrol tactics and techniques…but with limited funding and time, they are not all skilled at “human” tracking. This is vital to stay a step ahead of poachers.

At Fight for Rhinos, we are looking to provide this essential training to their anti-poaching unit. This APU is located in southern Kruger, a hotspot for rhino poaching. Having lost rhino already, this makes them a target. Once poachers achieve success, they will come back, looking to repeat their success.

Your donations will directly impact this area; keeping not only the rhinos safer, but the rangers as well. Please help and give what you can. Your donations and purchases are urgently needed.

Our goal is to provide the training by February.

Illustration by Sophia Maria

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Welcome to Kruger, home of the Rhinos

Kruger National Park is home to the majority of the Earth’s remaining rhino populations. So what else do we know about the rhinos’ home?

*Kruger National Park is the largest game reserve in Africa. It spans across 19,633 square kilometres, basically the same size of Israel or New Jersey.

crocodile bridge south entrance

*There are 9 gates accessing the park, adding to the difficulty to monitor and patrol human activity in the park.

*It is also home to 336 tree, 49 fish, 34 amphibian, 114 reptile, 507 bird and 147 mammal species.

*In 1869 (before the park was officially even founded), a gold rush exploded in the region, which resulted in the side effect of a significant decrease in game due to hunting and trading of animal horns and skins.

paul kruger and james stevenson hamilton

(L) Founder,Paul Kruger (R) James Stevenson Hamilton, the first game warden

*The park  itself didn’t come into existence until 1898, when it was founded  by Paul Kruger.

*The first game warden was appointed in 1902.

*The first motorist officially entered the park in 1927. Today Kruger has over a million visitors a year.

rhino crossing at kruger by marla sink druzgal

Rhino crossing at Kruger by Marla Sink Druzgal

*There are important archaeological ruins in Kruger, providing ample evidence that prehistoric man roamed the area between 500,000 and 100,000 years ago.

south african national defence force

The South African Defence Force has been added to enhance the anti-poaching strategies in Kruger.

Of course the biggest current threat to Kruger is poaching. The parks anti-poaching efforts consist of:

  • employing 650 rangers
  • receiving additional assistance from the police and National Defence Force
  • drones
  • a canine unit

Kruger holds a rich history, and it’s role to the future of the world’s rhinos, makes it a critical area of protection and preservation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

World Ranger Day – THANK YOU

world ranger day

The depth of our gratitude is endless, as these people put it all on the line, affording the rest of us more time to rack our brains to come up with a solution. We are indebted to them all for their perseverance and very existence, as without them we would never fully possess our sanity, let alone be able to sleep. To know they are there, on guard, watching, listening; it is a comfort like no other.

Thank you for your hearts, your strength. KNOW we stand beside you during the patrols, in the silence of the night, in the heat of the forest, during times of fear, fatigue, and despair. You are each an inspiration, a hero.

Thank you for everything you do. You are a blessing to the animals. May God keep you safe. -Gerri

Thank you to all the wonderful Rangers that perform such a dedicated job to help save the rhinos from poachers! -Jo Wiest

Thank you rangers! -Lisa Chien Hunkler

The entire Fabrily Team would like to extend our gratitude to the brave Rangers who risk their lives daily to protect our planet’s precious wildlife. Thanks to your efforts rhinos, elephants, lions and many more species are being saved from extinction. Please continue this important work and know that you’ve got our appreciation and support!  ~ Fabrily Team, UK

I visited South Africa in August 2014 and it changed me forever.  I was incredibly moved by the amazing creatures who live in the protected areas.  I became overwhelmed by the amount of nature we have lost on this planet.  And it saddened me greatly.  It still does. I don’t know how to thank you adequately for working to protect what’s left.  I know you put your lives on the line every day to protect animals from harm.  Please know that although I’ve never met you, I think of you all often, and I wish you well. I live in the state of Kentucky, in the USA.  From my small town I’m working to raise money for night vision equipment for rangers.  My group, the Try Anything Rhino Project, has already purchased one piece of equipment that has arrived in South Africa in the last week or two.  I’m now working to raise funds to buy more. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for what you do.  You are all heroes.  I appreciate you more than you’ll ever know!! -Marla Knight-Dutille

 Please give our heartfelt thanks to all he Ranger Heroes out there! Wildlife Guardians, protectors of our precious wildlife, the world is forever in your debt. You truly are Guardian Angels for Wildlife -Thank you so much from Rebecca Bush & Family, UK
rangers 1
Thank you from the depths of my heart. The Indian rhino tattoo on my ankle is a reminder of these magnificent creatures who deserve the right to be free from humans. -Arden Zalman
Where do we begin? Because of YOU these lives carry on… THANK YOU for your dedication!!!! -Carla Viljoen
Thank You Rangers for your dedication and love of Animals. -Norma Crichton
We will never meet or talk, but you are in my mind and heart.  You have my admiration, respect, and gratitude.
I do what I can in the ways that I can, but YOU are the everyday living presence that does the work that will save so much in our world.Thank you, thank you.  I send good thoughts for your safety, health, strength, and peace. Catherine;Santa Rosa, California, USA
A huge thank you for all that you do to protect the vulnerable and magnificent creatures that share this world with us. You are true heroes-Sara Wickenden
Thank you Rangers for your brave efforts to protect wildlife.-Jean du Ross
We need companionate like you to protect these beautiful creatures.  May God Bless and protect you and the animals you care for. Thank you for your dedication and service-Dan Seme
You are the true protectors of our future.you might not know this but your efforts and true love you have for our animals are what keeps the planet alive.thank you from the bottom of my heart.you are true heros -Brendon Hoy
ranger with gorilla
Hello all your wildlife rangers, we want to say a big “THANK YOU” to you all for helping animals! You all are our HEROES!!! –Susanna Sikorski and Jens Strohkirch from Germany

TO ALL OF YOU WHO DO THIS HARD WORK- THANK YOU THANK YOU!!!!!!!!!! I read about as much as I can about your efforts, which are saving so many animals lives—at the same time, you have to deal with criminals who don’t care about anything but greed—so I just say a huge THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS TO HELP KEEP ALLTHE MAGNIFICENT CREATURES ALIVE—I PERSONALLY AM EXTREMELY GRATEFUL FOR ALL YOUR EFFORTS—Louise Smith

Rangers, I have the privilege of witnessing daily on WildEarth’s wildsafarilive.com, the love and care guides & rangers have for your wildlife.  I am blessed that I am able to witness ellies, lions, leopards, etc. thanks to the hard work and dedication you all put into your daily lives.  If it wasn’t for you, WE would have nothing to see and admire.  🙂 Keep up  the great work so WE can continue to be in awe.  WE are rooting for you, and praying for your safety and success.  Words cannot express enough, but I can say THANK YOU!Blessings, Vicky Sanders, New Mexico USA

To all the Rangers in the World, You’re true guardians of the Earth and the vital eco-systems we need to desperately protect. I’m heart broken for the tragedy in your work but we must all fight for your triumphs. -Thank you, Paula

KWS rangers line up

 

It is not money, goodwill or millions of people who care so much about wildlife, that actually saves it. That all helps, tremendously; but it is the rangers who actually save our animals. I have never had so much respect for anyone. Thank you! -Jenna Grant

Thank you for all that you do to protect our most precious and endangered wildlife. Thank you for doing your best to keep them safe and sound. You are the extraordinary and elite. I wish you many blessings and thanks. -Love Always, Susan
Thank you so much for all your hard work and dedication to help saving these animals. We all owe you so much.  -Anita
My heart breaks so much each time I read a horrendous poaching story. But it heals each time I hear of the wonderful work you do. Humanity must respect all animals, who give so much to us. Respect their habitat, their spirit and their being. We are all in this together. Thank you a million times over! -Janis Byrne
Thanks for your effort, love and hearts in action towards Rhino protection. Hope for the best outcome in their and your lives in harmony and soon! Love to you all. Many thanks all the way from Argentina. 🙂 -Marita  ❤ 😉
I’d like to thank you for all that you do. You are in my heart, and I am certain in the hearts of every adult and child who has ever reflected on the importance of the preservation of the Earth that we all share and belong to. The feeling of struggle is progressively relieved with every animal that is protected. This helps us all, even economically. We love you! -Santos of California
Zambia female officer
You are protectors of those animals who need you. You are their voice. Without you, they would be gone. I can’t thank you enough for the service you do. Bless you. Please have hope and love in your hearts. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! -Kari Tucker
You’re great at what you’re doing! Keep doing it because we need these animals! They’re important to a lot of people and what you guys are doing is an amazing thing! -Hannah
To my heroes – Thank you for all that you do every day to stop poachers and care for the animals that survive this horrific crime.  What you do for these majestic animals is so amazing.  I can only hope to someday see these animals with my own eyes in their own habitat and it will be because of your efforts.  And if I don’t ever get to see them, knowing that they are still alive because of your efforts is all I really need.  Thank you for saving these beautiful animals. Best-Abbie

Thank you for all you do to protect these beautiful creatures. Full of admiration for your bravery and dedication x Best wishes-Amy G

Beyond thanking you, I am unsure what else to say. You are protecting the inalienable rights, life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness, of the wildlife. They lack a voice our society to request the protections which we enjoy and take for granted. Please continue your fine work and let the rest of us know how to better assist you.
Thank you. Sincerely, Ken
ranger with rhino near hand
I want you to know that if I was able I would be there to help. You are an inspiration in this cruel world. What you are doing is truly remarkable and I hope that you continue to save and protect these magnificent creatures. We are losing our beautiful animals on this planet at such a rapid rate it is horrific. Unfortunately mankind carries on. Thank you for all that you do. Keep up the fight. Thank you. –Sandra Mason, Mono, Ontario

On World Ranger Day  my  message of thanks goes to all those men and women who are prepared to lay their lives for the protection of their country’s wildlife heritage. This is often done enduring hardships and difficult conditions , for disproportionately low salaries. Their dedication is often overshadowed by other figures (‘the experts’) who provide technical and scientific knowledge for Nature conservation. Governments , in any country, should make it a priority to provide better conditions for these men and women, the game rangers: not only for the purpose of incentivizing an increasingly important profession, but also to express a nation’s gratitude for their sacrifice. Rangers are aware of the high risks they face , especially where poaching is conducted with extreme determination and violence,  and their choice of enforcing the law makes their work even more commendable. Thank you, for you are today’s heroes for tomorrow’s enjoyment of Nature by our children! –Silvana Olivo, France

Thank you wonderful folks, I appreciate all that you are doing! Bless you, may your lord be with you always! Thank you again! –Carol D

Thank you for your courage and commitment to protect the most endangered animals on the planet. It takes a special kind of person to be a wildlife ranger! –Yasmine Saad

Thank you so much for all that you do to protect our wildlife. Our national and state parks, and the plants and animals within them, are a treasure that you work so hard to preserve and protect—that does not go unnoticed or unappreciated! Your service means the world :)-Sophia D

Thanks so much for all you do to protect our planet! This World Ranger Day, and every day, let us never forget those who have given their lives to protect our wildlife and environment from poachers, polluters, and others intent on causing harm. Your bravery and sacrifices will not be forgotten! –Jeremy Taylor, Ravena, NY USA

So many of you sent support and appreciation for our rangers. We will be sending these messages to our friends at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, the Black Mambas APU, Game Reserves United (GRU) & RPU Program in Indonesia.

To further support our efforts with them, please purchase our limited edition summer tee: FIGHT FOR THE RHINOS YOU LOVE tees

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

The Voice of Reason

The permission has been granted for the American trophy hunt of a Namibian black rhino. The stance of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is that by killing this “old bull” it will aid in conservation. But I invite the director Daniel Ashe to listen closely to the people who know best, the men and women on the ground.

black rhino alamy

Namibian black rhino (by Alamy)

 “In forty years of close association with black rhinoceros, I have NEVER known of a free ranging wild old male past his breeding period targeting, and killing, rhino females and calves but, rather, the odd fights have only, in my own experience, occurred amongst breeding competing males, as is common in other species.

In Africa old age is respected: by extension, it is un-African and basically unethical not to allow an old male that sired many calves a peaceful retirement, in the same way as breeding bulls in the cattle world are put out to pasture, not sent to the butcher, once they stop being productive. It is equally unethical to use two sets of measures for poachers, who shoot a wild animal for financial gain, and are arrested or shot, and for a wealthy legal hunter who can pay a fortune for the pleasure to kill it, and is congratulated instead? In both cases a dead endangered animal is the end product. This auction is cruel, ill-timed, and to be condemned.

If the person bidding to shoot the rhino bull has that spare cash available, why not DONATE it to the cause and leave the poor rhino alone? The old rhino does not deserve a bullet.

– Kuki Gallmann; Conservationist, author, founder of The Gallmann Memorial Foundation and honorary game warden.” 

 

Please tell the USFWS how your feel (civilly)    USFWS

Email: dan_ashe@fws.gov
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/usfws
Twitter: @DirectorDanAshe @SecretaryJewell
‪ #‎ShameUSFWS‬ ‪#‎KillTheTrade‬

 

– See more at: http://africageographic.com/blog/kenyan-rangers-moving-letter-to-american-rhino-hunter/#sthash.2r4GBqvU.dpuf

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Ranger Jack

Spotlighting one of Kenya’s finest wildlife warriors-

ranger jack

Ranger Jack

Name: Jackson Pemba Kuyioni
Age: 24 years old
Location: Nairobi National Park, Rhino Unit

What is the most rewarding thing about your job as a ranger?

Jack: The most rewarding part is that i have developed both socially and economically.I have interacted with different people from different places worldwide and as a result shared experiences, ideas among others. Socially have resulted to my economic development especially when I meet with businessmen and women, as they encourage me in protecting flora and fauna. This is where I got ideas of investment which am planning to do.

What are the biggest challenges?

Jack: Challenges I face as ranger are quite numerous but these are the major ones *harsh environments especially during the rain ,cold and presence of moonlight which is advantageous to poachers.
*lack of teamwork (although its rare)
*lack of modern equipment (eg.GPS,night vision)
*limited time with my family and friends
*long working hours
*poor payment

Where would you like to visit?

Jack: America and Australia

What’s your favorite meal?

Jack: Milk and ugali

What are your hobbies?

Jack: Bird-watching, watching wildlife documentaries, nature walks and visiting friends.

What do you wish you had to help fight poachers?

Jack: I believe there are many things, but community involvement is the best. Community is a stakeholder in conservation ; in Kenya about 60% of wildlife is outside protected areas where in this places they coexist with people. Poachers live in the community and they are members , once the community is educated then getting information about poachers will be easier.

Why did you become a ranger?

Jack: I became a ranger because of the passion I had for wildlife conservation, I am passionate of being a ranger and am proud of it. I admire anything related to wildlife. Before I became a ranger I had a lot of interest in conservation but when I became a ranger it was the best for me, interracting directly with wildlife.

What do your family and friends think of your profession?

Jack: They always say i am well paid, that  I am playing critical role in protecting wildlife . Some think that its an easy job, to some its hard especially dealing with problematic animals like hippopotamus.

Categories: Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Ranger Heroes: Paul

Facing element, animal, and poacher, our rangers are the frontline in a bloody war of politics and principle. With the poaching stats rising, trade talk resurfacing, and in the midst of yet another full moon, it’s guys like Paul who help me sleep at night!

Name: PaulPaul

Age: 33

Location: Specialized counter poaching operator near Hoedspruit

What has been your most rewarding OR most difficult moment as a ranger?

Paul: The most rewarding thing doing what I do, is looking into the eyes of the poacher/suspect that you’ve hunted for so long. The most difficult is when we have to react, and proactive goes out the door.

Where would you like to travel someday?

Paul:  Anywhere in the world where people live in harmony with their surroundings and have respect for their animals

What is your favorite meal?

Paul:  I can’t leave any seafood or pasta alone

What is your ideal day off ?

Paul: Spending time with loved ones if possible. If not, then sleeping as much as I can.

What do you wish you had to fight poachers?

Paul:  We don’t need a lot of tech(nology) to fight these poachers, we just need more dedicated passionate operators in the field, and not just for the rhinos but the whole natural living eco-system.

What do your family/friends/significant other think of your profession? And do they worry?

Paul:  My family respect what I do, but don’t like it, as its always better for the next person to do it, but F*** That! I AM the next person.  This is not something you get to do because it’s a career choice, its something you are born with, passion for standing for something which belongs to the earth and everything on it.

Paul and rhino 3

 

 

Categories: Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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