Posts Tagged With: Rangers

World Rhino Day 2016

When is World Rhino Day?

September 22nd

What’s the point of World Rhino Day?

Recognizing and appreciating rhinos, particularly through raising awareness to the imminent danger they face. The poaching crisis and illegal wildlife trade very possibly could mean the end of their species.

What can you do to help ensure a future for rhinos?

*Spread the word that rhinos are in danger! Poaching is a serious issue that is pushing rhinos toward extinction. Use #WorldRhinoDay to talk about the poaching crisis.
*Support rhino conservation through donations.

Share the following:

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Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Waiting Game

ranger in tall grass

photo: unknown

Broken laces,

Thin soled boots

Uniforms worn as second skin.

Rifle at ready

Watching, waiting, listening

Time ticks

As silence invites to be broken.

Night’s campfires can’t warm,

Day’s heat smothers like a thick blanket

Minds wander, sleep beckons

Time ticks

Yesterday a success

for death found neither

ranger nor rhino and

life resumes.

Will tomorrow bring the same?

The hours will tell

Time ticks

as shift draws toward a close.

Back home families wait

and wonder.

 

By Tisha Wardlow

 

Categories: Poetry & Art, Ranger Heroes | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

A “Bullet” for future poachers

The anti-poaching units work long hard hours in harsh conditions. They are tough, skilled, dependable and absolutely imperative to the survival of our remaining rhinos. And some of them aren’t even human.

Welcome Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centres newest recruit: Bullet.

Bullet

Bullet is an 8 week old Malinois. He will already begin his training within the week! Anti-poaching dogs are HIGHLY effective in the war on poaching, but can cost up to $10,000 for one animal!

We have so far raised approximately $400 toward Chloe’s training, and are looking to further help Bullet and other members of the canine APU team at HESC.

Your help is needed and appreciated! DONATE via Paypal and please help spread the word! With your help, someday soon Bullet will be able to easily sniff out ammunition and gun powder just like Chloe!

Categories: Good News, Making a Difference | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

T-shirt Time!

We need to raise $1,152 to support Chloe’s canine ranger class at Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre.

With the purchase of a tee, you can help do that and SHOW your support by being a valuable part of our Rhino Security Team!

T-shirts are 100% cotton, available in 4 colors from S to XL, at a cost of just $19.99 usd.

FFR Chloe Tee

Not purchasing a tee? Please consider a straight donation through our Paypal button on the top left of the page. Your support means a lot.

Chloe

Chloe

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Meet Chloe

The Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre is a South African wildlife sanctuary devoted to rehabilitating endangered and vulnerable animals, most notably the cheetah and rhino.

In recent weeks, they have taken in several orphaned rhinos, and it is critical their security and anti-poaching efforts are maximized, for the safety of the animals and staff.

Baby N Muddy Olivia hesc

Fight for Rhinos is working with the HESC on canine training for their APU. We urgently need your support to send Chloe through her anti-poaching training to keep these little ones safe during their rehabilitation.

Chloe is a 2 year old Belgian Malinois. What makes Chloe so special is that she has been selected for anti-poaching training at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre!
Often poachings are only discovered after a rhino is killed. The key to a successful anti-poaching unit is the ability to be pro-active and minimize the loss of rhinos in the first place.

A well trained dog is an integral part of that plan. As a Belgian Malinois, Chloe is gifted with the intelligence and ability to smell and detect the faintest of scents. In fact, many of the APUs in Kruger National Park utilize the same breed.

ranger and dog search vehicle

Ranger and dog in vehicle search at Kruger. photo:SanParks

 According to Albe, the head of the APU who will be handling her, “Chloe can help us to detect contraband in vehicles , houses  and areas around houses or also at crime scenes. She will be used during road blocks with the police and we will check all vehicles entering our reserve. This pro-active work will deter poachers from coming into our area in the first place. If they dare to enter our reserve, the dog will be able to detect the hidden firearms and ammunition before the poachers will be able to kill the rhinos.”

          DONATE FOR CHLOE

Training will take place for ten weeks, a week of which will be spent on the reserve she will be protecting. With this training, she will be accredited and registered. This is important, as only evidence found by an accredited dog can be used in a court for criminal prosecution.
ffr hesc logos
 
 
 
 
 
 
Categories: Good News, Making a Difference | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Rhino conservation is going to the dogs

Nairobi stray trained in apu by jeremy goss

This Nariobi stray was trained and utilized in a Kenyan APU. Photo: Jeremy Goss

With the ability to hear at a distance 4x greater and at a higher pitch,
the amazing ability to feel or sense energy,
and with a sense of smell 1,000 to 10,000,000 times more sensitive than a human
dogs are the perfect anti-poaching weapon.

Like the superman of an anti-poaching team, they can work long hours through harsh conditions, picking up the trail of a poacher without hesitation. They can search a car in 3-4 minutes, while it can take an hour to search with humans alone. And they are relentless to reach their goal.

Utilized everywhere from  Kruger National Park, the Congo, Kenya, and Zambia; they are trained to track poachers, to locate ivory and horn, and even to repel from helicopters.

dog propeling from copter by paramount group

K9 Conservation Training practicing repelling with ranger and his canine companion. Photo: Paramount Group

The most frequently used breeds are Bloodhounds, Weimaraner , Malinois, and Antaloian Shepherds. Dog selection is based partially on specific working conditions and most importantly on personality and demeanor.

According to Megan Parker, from Working Dogs Conservation in Montana, “bad” dogs don’t make great pets, but their personalities are perfect for conservation work.

The perfect example of this comes from a “bad” dog named Ruger. Found in an animal shelter and highly “unadoptable”, he has successfully been trained in anti-poaching work. The first anti-poaching canine in Zambia, Ruger has put away 150 poachers to date. And all this work for what? A reward of a game of tug-o-war with his favorite chew toy.

shelter dog helps rangers

Ruger with the Delta Team in Zambia. Photo:unknown.

With all the perks of working with dogs, perhaps Damien Bell, director of Big Life Tanzania, sums it up best.

“Apart from their incredible tracking abilities, dogs are wonderful to work with because they don’t have any political agenda—they can’t be compromised. “

 

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Ranger Emmah

Name: Emmanuel

Age: 24 years old

Location: Tanzania Mwanza region

Emmah ranger

Ranger Emmah

I choose to be a ranger because when I was young I got interested in wild and domestic animals.  The issue of conservation is in my blood and was also my dreams, because my father also is a veterinary.

When the time goes and the population of human beings increase, so does the issue of poaching of animals such as elephants and rhinos and antelopes. That activity make me unhappy so I told my father that I want to study in a College of Wildlife Management; when I was studying my ambition was to be working in a National Park or Game reserve.

What has been your most rewarding and most difficult moment as a ranger?

As a ranger my most rewarding time is during Summer season because of the infrastructure of road is good when moving from one place or one point to another point. The most difficult time as a ranger is during the Winter or rain season because of the infrastructure is not suitable.

How much do you work, what is your schedule like?

I work day and night, summer and winter, all seasons of the year to ensure that our wild animals who are mostly sought after by poachers are surviving and are not killed.

ugali-nyama

Ugali is a dish of flour cooked with water to a porridge- or dough-like consistency.

What’s your favorite meal?

Ma favourite meal is Ugali,Rice and meat or fish

Where would you like to travel someday?

 Here in Africa I would like to travel to South Africa and see how rhino are protected and conserved there. But the other place which I would like to travel is Europe, in a country such as the UK or France.
 
What do you think we can do to make a difference and ensure a future for rhinos?
 
 To ensure a future for our Rhino we need  to make sure that we have enough tools and equipment such as guns, cars, shoes, combat essentials, and communication equipment such as satellite phones or radios; and enough funds for the ranger for training and  good knowledge and experience in conservation issues.
 We also need to make sure that villagers and local people are well-informed about the importance of wild animals; and to destroy the market for rhinos in Asian countries.
All in all we must tell the world that only Rhino wear horns.
Emmah ranger 3

   Emmah

Categories: Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

APU gets extra help from YOU

THANK YOU!

The “Helping Rangers Protect Rhinos” campaign was a success! We’ve reached our goal for an anti-poaching unit in southern Kruger to attend a human-tracking course.

After experiencing loss of rhino in their area, a ranger had come to us for help to attend crucial training in human tracking. According to him  doing this specified human tracking will enable us to see clearly where and how the poachers came and to follow them if they’re inside the park.

The training will take place in early June with the Colin Patrick Training Company, a highly reputable, experienced training organization.

Here is a peek of Colin’s work with a lucky group of individuals:

We thoroughly appreciate contributions from:
Nick DePilla
Matthew Rossetti
Gaetano Bonaviri
Tony Calvelage
two anonymous donors
Carl Wolter
Edward Zullo
Manuel Pardo
Art by Marion
Anita Wilson
Ted Racheau
Angel Rodriguez
Eileen McCloskey

You have helped make a corner of the world safer for a group of men and countless rhinos and elephants!

Categories: Good News, Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

How much is a ‘Thank You’ worth?

Looking for a job where you’re unappreciated? Employee must:

  •  work for minimal wages
  • work long hours, spending weeks away from family
  • sleep in the bush in rain, sun, cold and heat
  • be constantly alert for wildlife hazards (i.e snakes, cape buffalo, lions, etc)
  • may be injured or killed at any given moment

southern africa wildlife college

Sound extreme? That’s the life of a wildlife ranger. They do get appreciation from conservationists, at least in words. At “Fight for Rhinos”, we see plenty of “Thank You’s” in gratitude of their undaunting work. Unfortunately words are not enough. They need and deserve so much more.

In our current campaign “Training Rangers to Protect Rhinos”, we are raising funds to send an anti-poaching unit to human tracker training. This group has basic training, but is inexperienced with HUMAN tracking. In order to prevent more loss of rhino,  and for the safety of the rangers, we are seeking funds to send them to an Anti-Poaching Tracking Course .

A combined effort of “Go Fund Me” along with PayPal donations on our site have brought us to $600. We only need $400 more.

If all of our followers shared this story and turned their “thank you” into even $5, we would not only surpass our goal, but be able to send 13 more APUs to training!

Please help. Your little bit goes a LONG way.

Donate at Go Fund Me or Paypal on the left corner of our page.

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Categories: Making a Difference, Ranger Heroes, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Indiscriminate Wildlife Killer

Poaching, an ongoing global threat to wildlife, usually brings to mind bad guys with guns and machetes intent on stealing rhino horns and elephant tusks.

snare 1

Generally nature doesn’t make circles, this is a good rule of thumb in detecting snares in the bush.

But another poaching method, silent, yet just as deadly are snares. Relatively easy to come by telephone or cable wire is used to trap whatever comes into its path.

While some animals caught in snares will end up in the cooking pot, as many as an estimated 90% will be left to rot in the bush  -Nick Tucker: Horror of Snares, Africa Geographic.

The majority suffer a painful, lingering death.

baby ele in poach snare dswt

This baby elephant was found with a snare around its leg, cutting to the bone. Thankfully rescued in time by the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust, this little one was lucky. photo: DSWT

Rangers spend precious time and energy on snare detection and removal on a daily basis. While they may remove a number of snares from a given area, it is not uncommon they will find new snares in the same area the very next day. It is an ongoing battle to locate the snares before they do damage.

One poacher can set as many as twenty snares a day.

snare removal team

The Kibale National Park in Uganda employs an entire team to snare detection and removal 26 days a month. The team finds hundreds of snares a year. photo: Kibale Chimpanzee Project.

The damage is more expansive than typical elephant and rhino poaching, as it indiscriminately kills zebras, giraffes, lions, antelope, bushbuck, etc. It is problematic all across the dark continent as well as other parts of the world.

According to Nikela, no one really knows how many animals and birds are trapped and killed by snares for bushmeat and illegal trading.  We do know it ranks in the thousands, if not millions each year.

snares by ranger maxwell, photo nikela

This ranger and his team found 60 new snares in one month of patrolling their area, and 17 snares with trapped wildlife. photo Nikela

warthog wire art painted dog conservation fund

Some groups have turned recycled snare wires into an opportunity for awareness and funding for conservation through creating jewelry and art. This warthog was made via Art Center for the Painted Dog Conservation.

 

 

 

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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