Posts Tagged With: South Africa

Saving rhinos with Art

True colors by Angela Casey

Want to save rhinos?

When Rhinos Fly by Julie Keeney

Need a gift idea?

 

Majestic Ele by David Small

Or just want to treat yourself?

Affordable, unique artwork can be yours.

When: Aug 28 through Sept 4

Where: Online through Bidding Owl

How: Each piece will have a minimum start price, simply choose the piece that catches your eye, and place your bid. At the end of the final day (Sunday, Sept 4) the winning bids will be contacted. You will have 24 hrs to respond. If you do not, the second highest bid will be contacted.

*ALL proceeds will benefit our projects at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya and Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center in South Africa.

 

 

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Poetry & Art, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

World Ranger Day 2017

Today is an opportunity to give rangers the appreciation and respect they deserve. When laws are weak, technology is expensive, and the price on an animal’s head is high, the only thing literally standing between a poacher and rhino, is the ranger.

We salute you all! Thank you for your dedication, bravery and efforts. You truly are our heroes.

Photo: Bruce Adams

 

 

 

 

 

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Ngwenya, the first APU canine

Canines are a highly sought after and integral part of the most successful anti-poaching units. With advanced training, their keen skills enable rangers to be more effective and efficient.

But initially people were skeptical the canines could be effective in an environment alongside the Big Five.

In 2010, the first canine was trialed in Kruger National Park. Ngwenya (whose name means crocodile), proved her critics wrong. Since then, there no less than 50 working dogs in Kruger alone.

Fight for Rhinos proudly supports the HESC (Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center) and OPC (Ol Pejeta Conservancy) APU canines.

Please donate to keep the ranger’s dogs working, and the rhinos safe.

Ngwenya, photo: Ravi Gajjar

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Survivor and Mom..twice

Survivor of a brutal poaching

from Kariega Reserve 2012

Bringer of hope and life, becoming a mom

with daughter Thembi, Kariega Reserve, 2015

 

Defying the odds, birthing a second calf

with son, Colin, April 2017

Is there anyone who embodies what it means to be a mom more than the infamous Thandi? Happy Mother’s Day!

Categories: Rhino Ramblings, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Miracle rhino gives birth (again)!

Thandi’s a mama (again)-watch the video

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First glimpses of mama and baby from Ranger Daniel @ Kariega.    

Read about Thandi’s Story and about her first baby, Thembi, It’s Official, Thandi’s a mum! 

Categories: Good News, Rhino Spotlight | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Dogs are changing the world for rhinos

One of our greatest passions at Fight for Rhinos is in helping canine anti-poaching units. Dogs are a huge game-changer in the poaching war!

Categories: Good News, Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Rhino Wrap up 2016

What a year! While rhino poaching persists, so does the war to stop it. This year thanks to the generosity and concern from all of you, we have managed to provide much needed help to the following:

Kruger Park APU

$2370.00 usd to human tracker training— We received a plea for help from a ranger who was part of a smaller APU in southern Kruger. They had been hit by the poaching of rhino in their area and felt they needed to be better equipped to prevent being hit again.

We were able to provide human tracker training where they learned more about early detection in suspicious human activity, (i.e. poaching camps, tracks, snares) apprehension of suspicious individuals,and gathering intelligence and evidence.

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Some of the APU involved in tracker training.

Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre

$5500.00 usd to APU canine training–The centre specializes in cheetahs and various wildlife rehabilitation, but with the large number of rhinos being poached, there is a huge need for help rehabilitating the rhino orphans.

Having taken in several rhinos, the need for increased security includes initiating a canine unit for their APU. We started with Chloe, one of the APU dogs for the entire Kapama area (of which HESC is a part). From there, we were able to help with HESC’s own canine unit, including Zee and Bullet.

The training includes the advanced levels for all dogs, including a trainer from the Centre who will accompany them.

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Zee and Bullet @HESC

  Ol Pejeta Conservancy

$3000.00 usd to anti-poaching supplies— Home to the largest black rhino sanctuary in east Africa, as well as the last three Northern White Rhinos on the planet, security is probably THE most urgent need for Ol Pejeta. Everything from boots and tents to training and upgrades are needed to benefit the APUs. (More details to follow).

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OPC rangers take part in regular trainings to keep their skills sharp.

Thank you for fighting with us in this poaching war. Your donations are not taken lightly. For each amount given leads to action taken to protect rhinos and to keep rangers safe. Please continue to work with us, together we ARE making a difference!

Categories: Good News, Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Protecting rhinos with 4-legged rangers

We are pleased to announce with YOUR generosity, we have been able to fully fund the training of Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre’s APU canine unit!

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Trainer, Corlet; photo: HESC

A word to all of you from our friends at HESC:

Words cannot sufficiently express our gratitude towards Fight for Rhinos for being one of our most ardent and loyal supporters.

Fight for Rhinos generously committed to assisting with the successful care and training of our anti-poaching canines at HESC – both for the protection of our rhinos and the rangers.

Over the past few months, Fight for Rhinos has managed to successfully raise an amazing ZAR80 000 (5500 usd) which they’ve donated to HESC’s Wildlife Conservation Trust.

We are so thrilled by their effort and generosity. A BIG thank you to Fight for Rhinos and each and every person who contributed towards the campaign.

You can continue protecting rhinos by sponsoring our canine units at HESC and Ol Pejeta Conservancy with a monthly OR one time donation. Every dollar is a help toward keeping them safe.

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Zee and Bullet with handler, Simon. photo: HESC

Categories: Good News, Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

So little can mean so much

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Ol Pejeta rangers with anti poaching dogs.

A monthly gift can make all the difference for our canine APUs.

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A one time gift of $25 purchases kong balls and rope (positive reinforcement toys)

A one time gift of $50 purchases dog shoes (for bush terrain training)

Simply go to the DONATE button and select the MONTHLY option.

hesc-dogs

HESC canine APU

We currently work with Hoedspruit Endangered Species Center and Ol Pejeta APUs. With black and white rhinos, both wild and rehabilitating, canines are a critical part of success at keeping poachers at bay.

We are happy to provide end of year statements for your tax deductions.

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CITES Recap: the good, the bad and the ugly

The CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) 2008-2020 vision states
*they will be contributing to the conservation of wildlife as an integral part of the global ecosystem on which all life depends,
*as well as promoting transparency and wider involvement of civil society in the development of conservation policies and practices

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Are they following their vision?

Well, here’s a recap. The animals who reaped ‘benefits’ from increased protection are:

*Pangolins (trade was completely banned, and the most highly trafficked animals in the world were given highest protection status)

*African Gray Parrots (trade was completely outlawed)

*Sharks and Rays (Thirteen species of rays and Thresher and Silky sharks were given highest protection status)

In addition, proposals to grant legal trade in ivory and/or horn in Namibia, Zimbabwe and Swaziland were denied.

But the disheartening news was the denial of CITES to grant the highest level of protection to:

*Elephants 

*Rhinos 

*Lions 

An added issue for lions is the trade in captive bred lion parts remains legal. This perpetuates the Asian demand, and serves as an added incentive for South Africa to continue breeding farms. (Currently there are approximately 7,000 lions kept on 200 breeding farms throughout South Africa.)

seizures-of-lion-parts

© Data from UNEP-WCMC

In theory wild lion parts are not legally traded. Yet, there is no way to tell the difference between a wild lion bone and a captive lion bone. If money is to be made, bones will likely be obtained. Like a fenced in yard with surrounded by only  three sides, protection for Africa’s lion is incomplete, and proves worrisome to an even  faster decline.

In the end, the negligence to protect one species casts a shadow over the decision to protect others. It also casts doubt on the credibility and intentions of our CITES delegates.

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President Zuma at CITES. South Africa has been accused of “selling out” both elephants in lions in their votes against added protection. Photos by IISD/ENB | Kiara Worth

 

There is no necessity in trading lion parts, wild or captive. To perpetuate a market and feed a false cultural perception is not only ethically questionable, but also sends a mixed message in the overall trade of wildlife products. Why is one species an acceptable “commodity” over another? And if a species becomes “captive bred”, is the door open for that species to be traded as well?

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Currently there are approximately 7,000 lions kept on 200 breeding farms throughout South Africa photo: One Green Planet

For Appendices ratings, just how low do the numbers have to get for us to act? The Northern White Rhinos are a perfect example of the error in waiting too long. There are 3 left. They were never afforded protection in time. Why isn’t their predicament enough; does history teach us nothing?

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Only three Northern White Rhinos remain, all living in Kenya at Ol Pejeta Conservancy. photo: Brent Stirton/Nat Geo

(It is important to note that upgrading lions to the Appendix I status would ONLY have affected wild lions, and would not have afforded protection to their captive cousins.)

 

 

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

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