Posts Tagged With: tracking

Meet Chloe

The Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre is a South African wildlife sanctuary devoted to rehabilitating endangered and vulnerable animals, most notably the cheetah and rhino.

In recent weeks, they have taken in several orphaned rhinos, and it is critical their security and anti-poaching efforts are maximized, for the safety of the animals and staff.

Baby N Muddy Olivia hesc

Fight for Rhinos is working with the HESC on canine training for their APU. We urgently need your support to send Chloe through her anti-poaching training to keep these little ones safe during their rehabilitation.

Chloe is a 2 year old Belgian Malinois. What makes Chloe so special is that she has been selected for anti-poaching training at the Hoedspruit Endangered Species Centre!
Often poachings are only discovered after a rhino is killed. The key to a successful anti-poaching unit is the ability to be pro-active and minimize the loss of rhinos in the first place.

A well trained dog is an integral part of that plan. As a Belgian Malinois, Chloe is gifted with the intelligence and ability to smell and detect the faintest of scents. In fact, many of the APUs in Kruger National Park utilize the same breed.

ranger and dog search vehicle

Ranger and dog in vehicle search at Kruger. photo:SanParks

 According to Albe, the head of the APU who will be handling her, “Chloe can help us to detect contraband in vehicles , houses  and areas around houses or also at crime scenes. She will be used during road blocks with the police and we will check all vehicles entering our reserve. This pro-active work will deter poachers from coming into our area in the first place. If they dare to enter our reserve, the dog will be able to detect the hidden firearms and ammunition before the poachers will be able to kill the rhinos.”

          DONATE FOR CHLOE

Training will take place for ten weeks, a week of which will be spent on the reserve she will be protecting. With this training, she will be accredited and registered. This is important, as only evidence found by an accredited dog can be used in a court for criminal prosecution.
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Categories: Good News, Making a Difference | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 7 Comments

Help the rangers in Kruger!

In addition to assisting Ol Pejeta and the Black Mambas, we are currently raising funds to support an anti-poaching unit in southern Kruger National Park. This APU has lost rhinos in recent months, and are in need of additional training to track poachers.

By providing them with training of human tracking, this will enhance their skills, cut down the chances of poaching, and further equip them in protecting wildlife in the area.

By purchasing an ornament, a piece of art or making a donation, you will provide necessary support for our project.

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Ranger in Kruger National Park. photo: Marco Longari

 

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Opportunity of a Lifetime: Don’t Miss It!

We are really excited to launch the details of our inaugural Helping Rhinos Exclusive Safari.  This is your chance to go on a trip of a life time, while at the same time making a practical contribution to rhino conservation.  Plus a significant amount of the money from your safari will directly fund Helping Rhinos/Fight for Rhinos in our field projects.

You’ll have the chance to take part in a rhino darting and chipping procedure, go tracking rhinos with telemetry and go behind the scenes at the world famous Kruger National Park to see the work being done to put a stop to the poaching crisis!!

See all the details below, but hurry if you would like to come along.  This really is an exclusive trip and there are just 6 places available.  To book your place call our travel partner Native Escapes on +44 (0)1342 834 700.

This trip is available to US and UK residents! If you have any questions, please contact Helping Rhinos OR Fight for Rhinos (fightforrhinos@gmail.com)

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Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Man’s (and now Rhino’s) Best Friend

Bloodhound and ranger in Virunga Nat. Park.

Bloodhound and ranger in Virunga Nat. Park.

With poaching so prevalent, too much space and too little manpower, a different approach is being utilized to stop poachers. Dogs.

In the Congo, an elite canine anti-poaching unit is employed to track down elephant poachers. Specially trained bloodhounds, who require a 2 year training program, have already aided rangers in chasing poachers down. In Virunga National Park, the first instance out they pursued the suspects for 7km.

In South Africa, the Rhino Orphanage is training dogs to help keep track of and protect the baby rhinos; rhino security if you will.  (see: Duma: The Rhino Dog)

In Gabon, dogs are being utilized in the airport to detect illegal wildlife. The program has been quite successful, with the canines finding shark fin and bushmeat in addition to ivory.

Gabon's tracking team works for a tennis ball.

Gabon’s tracking team works for a tennis ball.

Green Dogs Conservation and Congohounds  are two non-profit groups situated in South Africa, specializing in training dogs for anti-poaching and other conservation purposes. Trained similar to police dogs, they are given basic training and aptitude testing, matching the right dog to the right situation.

As Green Dogs points out, 60% of the brain of a dog is devoted to smell. They can detect scents we aren’t even aware of. Congohounds states, bloodhounds can detect a single smell out of 5 million!

Search and rescue dogs have long been trained to find people, landmines, drugs, and even cancer. With their phenomenal sense of smell and high energy, it’s a perfect fit to train them to track and detain poachers.

Duma and Ntombi getting acquainted.

Duma and Ntombi getting acquainted.

 

Categories: Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Chips for RHINOS! and It’s not the kind you EAT..:)

RhinoChip

Microchips to protect Rhinos in Kenya –

(article courtesy of the WWF )

Nairobi, Kenya – Efforts to conserve Kenya’s dwindling population of rhinos is set to get a significant boost when WWF-Kenya hands over 1,000 microchips and 5 scanners to the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) today. The equipment valued at over KES 1.3 million will be instrumental in strengthening active rhino monitoring as well as stockpile audits (of rhino horn).

With poachers getting more sophisticated in their approach it is vital that conservation efforts embrace the use of more sophisticated technology to counter the killing of wildlife. The deployment of specialized rhino horn tracking systems combined with forensic DNA technology will allow for 100% traceability of every rhino horn and live animal within Kenya. This will serve to strengthen rhino monitoring, protect the animals on site and also support anti-trafficking mechanisms nationally and regionally.

Microrangers

Furthermore, investigators will be able to link any poached case to a recovered or confiscated horn and this forms crucial evidence in court contributing towards the prosecution’s ability to push for sentencing of a suspected rhino criminal. These technologies are now being used internationally in support of criminal justice responses to wildlife crime as well as strengthening inter-agency collaborations (between customs, police, justice, wildlife agencies and defense).

At a continental and worldwide level, these technologies will expose the rhino horn trade chain and facilitate the dismantling of the networks that promote and sustain the International Wildlife Trade (IWT).

Find original article here: http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/successes/?211437/Microchips-to-Protect-Rhinos-in-Kenya

Categories: Making a Difference, Rhino Ramblings | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

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